Art

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What does this course involve at Key Stage 3?

Art and Design is a creative subject where students are given the opportunity to develop their ideas, whilst learning how to use a range of different art techniques and materials.  Students take part in a series of projects that explore different themes, artists and cultures so that they can appreciate the vast history of the subject.

What do you need to be successful in this course?

To be successful in this course students will be able to produce creative work that explores and records their ideas, experiences and observations. Students will improve their skills in a range of techniques including drawing, painting and 3D work. They will also be able to analyse and evaluate their own work and that of others, showing an understanding of different artistic and cultural points of view.

Year 7

There are six units of work in Key Stage 3 based on the universal themes of:

  1. Skills
  2. Portraiture
  3. Still Life

The Year 7 Art and Design course focuses on developing a foundation of basic skills. Students begin by drawing from direct observation before developing skills further using a range of materials and techniques.  They will explore the work of other artists, and begin to analyse work critically using specialist vocabulary, to inform their own practical work.

During the course of KS3, safe practice will be taught in painting, print making and basic sculpture. This will include safe handling of sharp implements such as craft knives and appropriate use of substances such as glues, paints and inks.

Students complete assessments for observational and contextual work each module.

Year 8

There are six units of work in Key Stage 3 based on the universal themes of:

  1. Commercial Art
  2. Environment
  3. Diversity

During Year 8 Students will build on the key skills learnt in Year 7, using an extended range of techniques and media to complete more complex work. They will be encouraged to take risks and to review and refine their work, expressing their own views. During the course of KS3, safe practice will be taught in painting, print making and basic sculpture. This will include safe handling of sharp implements such as craft knives and appropriate use of substances such as glues, paints and inks.

Student’s complete assessments for observational and contextual work each module graded at three levels emerging, secure and advanced.

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 Years 9, 10 and 11

Year 9 students will advance their skills by completing mini projects using a range of different materials, techniques and media. They will explore observational drawing, elements and principles of art, composition, perspective, colour theory, 3D work, printmaking, and mixed media.

In Year 10 they will complete two projects on Natural Form and Identity. They will explore acrylic paint, mark-making, contour drawing, photography, 3D work, coloured pencils, oil pastels, location sketching, collage, printmaking, and mixed media.

Year 11 students will complete their final pieces of coursework and make any necessary adjustments or changes.  From January 2nd they will be given their AQA exam paper; select a theme, and begin all preparatory work required.  Their final ten hour exam will take place in the spring term.  All work completed for and during the exam will count towards 40% of their final mark.

AQA GCSE Art, Craft and Design 

Year nine will be skills based with students completing several mini projects. During years ten and eleven, they will complete components 1 and 2 towards their Art, Craft and Design GCSE. They will be required to maintain a portfolio of work that shows thoughts, working process and skills for each component. Students will need to produce written research and analysis throughout the course. A high level of homework is also required. Their portfolio and final pieces of work produced during years ten and eleven will make up the coursework.

This course promotes learning across a variety of experiences and through various processes, tools, techniques, materials and resources.  This generates different kinds of evidence of working and outcomes.

Component 1: Portfolio of Work, worth 60% of the marks.

Students will produce a portfolio of work based around two themes. Student’s work for the portfolio is carried out under informal supervision, that is, under a sufficient level of supervision to ensure that the contribution of candidates can be recorded accurately, that work can be authenticated and that plagiarism does not take place. Students are guided to carefully select, organise and present materials, which show work carried out during their course of study.

For component one, students must explore and create work associated with areas of study from at least two titles listed below:

  • Fine art: for example drawing, painting, sculpture, installation, lens-/light-based media, photography, printmaking, mixed media and art.
  • Graphic communication: for example communication graphics, design for print, advertising and branding, illustration, package design, typography, signage and exhibition graphics.
  • Textile design: for example art textiles, fashion design and illustration, costume design, constructed textiles, printed and dyed textiles.
  • Three-dimensional design: for example architectural design, sculpture, ceramics, product design, jewellery and body adornment, interior design, environmental/landscape/garden design, exhibition design, three-dimensional digital design and designs for theatre.
  • Photography: for example portraiture, location photography, studio photography, experimental imagery, installation, documentary photography, photojournalism, and fashion photography.

Students are expected to provide evidence of meeting all four assessment objectives:

AO1: Develop ideas through investigations, demonstrating critical understanding of sources.

  • AO2: Refine work by exploring ideas, selecting and experimenting with appropriate media, materials, techniques and processes.
  • AO3: Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work progresses.
  • AO4: Present a personal and meaningful response that realises intentions and demonstrates understanding of visual language.

Component 2: Externally Set Task worth 40% of the marks, question papers are issued from January 2nd in Year 11.

Having selected their preferred assignment, students then have unlimited preparation time, followed by a hour exam in April. All work is marked by the Academy and moderated by AQA.

The course includes both practical and theory elements in lessons to be supported with homework, marks are awarded through completion of components.

Progression: After completion of the course, students could go on to study either A Levels or BTEC Level 3, or to further training in the creative Industries.

AQA GCSE Graphic Communication

Graphic Communication students will produce practical and critical/contextual work in one or more area(s) including illustration, advertising, packaging design, design for print, communication graphics, computer graphics and photography.

Component 1: Portfolio of work worth 60% of the marks

Students will produce a portfolio of work based around two themes. Student’s work for the portfolio is carried out under informal supervision, that is, under a sufficient level of supervision to ensure that the contribution of candidates can be recorded accurately, that work can be authenticated and that plagiarism does not take place. Students are guided to carefully select, organise and present materials, which show work carried out during their course of study.

They are expected to provide evidence of meeting all four assessment objectives:

  • AO1: Develop ideas through investigations, demonstrating critical understanding of sources.
  • AO2: Refine work by exploring ideas, selecting and experimenting with appropriate media, materials, techniques and processes.
  • AO3: Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work progresses.
  • AO4: Present a personal and meaningful response that realises intentions and demonstrates understanding of visual language.

Component 2: Externally Set Task worth 40% of the marks, question papers are issued from January 2nd in Year 11.

Having selected their preferred assignment, students then have unlimited preparation time, followed by a 10 hour exam in April. All work is marked by the Academy and moderated by AQA.

The course includes both practical and theory elements in lessons to be supported with homework, marks are awarded through completion of components.

After completing the course students could progress to study either A Levels or BTEC Level 3, or gain further training in the creative Industries.

Further information about the AQA course is available at: http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/art-and-design/gcse/art-and-design-8201-8206

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Year 12 and 13

BTEC Nationals Art and Design (2010)

The course is assessed through the completion of internally assessed assignment briefs that are then moderated. The assignments are graded at four levels: pass, merit, distinction and distinction*.

Year 12 – BTEC Level 3 Certificate – 500/7333/3

The BTEC Level 3 Certificate is broadly equivalent to one GCE AS Level. The following units are covered:

  • Unit 1: Visual Recording in Art and Design (mandatory for the certificate level)
  • Unit 4: Communication Through Art and Design (mandatory for the subsidiary diploma)
  • Optional Unit

Year 13 – BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma – 500/7144/0

The qualification consists of four mandatory units plus optional units over two years, and is equivalent to one ‘A’ level. Units are written as project briefs, which replicate those received by practising artists, craftspeople and designers in the creative industry.

A real commitment to the course is essential, as students will be expected to spend extra time in the department outside of taught lessons.

  • Unit 2: Materials, Techniques, and Processes in Art and Design (mandatory for the subsidiary diploma)
  • Unit 3: Ideas and Concepts in Art and Design (mandatory for the subsidiary diploma)
  • Optional Unit

Overview:

The course gives students the opportunity to work on both fine art and design briefs, working in a range of media from ceramics to digital photography. Students will develop a range of skills and techniques in art and design, whilst gaining personal skills and attributes essential for successful performance in working life.

Aims:

  • To develop drawing skills and learn how to apply them to a range of art and design disciplines.
  • To develop skills in a variety of media.
  • To work creatively and develop independent ideas in response to a given brief.
  • To develop research skills and learn how to use other artists, craftspeople and designers’ work to inspire and develop their own.

Further information about the BTEC L3 course is available at:

http://qualifications.pearson.com/content/dam/pdf/BTEC-Nationals/Art-and-Design/2010/Specification/9781446934746_BTEC_90c_L3_ArtDgn_Iss3.pdf