Law

justice on old paper background

law

Year 11 only

OCR GCSE Law equivalent to one GCSE

There are four units that students cover on a variety of topics. These are all mandatory units that students will need study to show fully rounded knowledge and understanding of the subject. These units are:

Unit 1: The nature of law. Criminal courts and criminal processes -This unit is in two parts. The first part is a basic introduction to the nature of law, why we have law, law making and the basic classifications of law. The second part is based on areas of knowledge and understanding of criminal courts and processes within the English legal system. Students are expected to have an appreciation of the role of the police, their powers and the protection of individuals; the basic structures and processes in the criminal justice process; an understanding of the role played by lay people (both magistrates and juries) in the criminal justice system, and the aims/purpose and practice of sentencing.

Unit 2: Civil courts and civil processes. Civil liberties and human rights -This unit is also in two parts. The first part is based on areas of knowledge and understanding of civil courts and processes within the English legal system. Students are expected to have an appreciation of the basic structures and systems in the civil justice process, including the courts and the alternatives; and an understanding of the part played by legal professionals (barristers and solicitors) and judges. The second part is based on areas of knowledge and understanding of basic civil liberties and fundamental human rights, the restrictions imposed on such freedoms and why rights have to be balanced against each other.

Unit 3: Employment rights and responsibilities – This unit is based on some fundamental areas of knowledge and understanding of rights and responsibilities which exist within the employment relationship. Students are expected to have an appreciation of the basic contractual nature of the relationship, the fact that identifying employment status is not absolutely straightforward and the fact that most employment protections apply only to employees. The unit also covers two specific aspects of employment protection: laws against discrimination and health and safety at work, as well as the protections for employees and employers where employees are dismissed.

Unit 4: Consumer rights and responsibilities – This unit is based on some fundamental areas of knowledge and understanding of rights and responsibilities which exist for consumers. Students are expected to have an appreciation of the basic contractual nature of the relationship but that regulation of consumer contracts is also affected by other areas of law, e.g. negligence. The unit also covers three specific aspects of consumer protection, contractual laws on buying goods and services, the regulation of unfair terms in consumer contracts, particularly those which exempt the seller/service provider from liability, and actions for compensation for losses caused by unsafe products.

Assessment: This course 100% exam based with 4, 1 hour externally assessed examinations worth 60 marks each, based on each of the units.

This course finishes at the end of the 2016-17 academic year.

Further information about the course is available at www.ocr.org.uk

ks5

Year 13 only

BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma in Applied Law (QCF) equivalent to 1 A level

There are three units that students cover in year 13, building on from their studies in Year 12. These units are all optional but will need to complete to show fully rounded knowledge and understanding of the subject and complete the A level equivalent qualification. The units being taught are:

Unit 4: Unlawful Homicide and Police Powers- This unit provides you with knowledge and understanding of two aspects of the law. The first is an introduction to homicide – the killing of a human being. Some homicide is lawful, for example during a wartime military operation, but this unit is concerned with examples of unlawful homicide. There are three kinds of unlawful homicide or fatal offences against the person – murder, voluntary manslaughter and involuntary manslaughter. Learners will explore the necessary elements of these crimes and the differences between murder and manslaughter, including the concept of malice aforethought. You will then consider current case law and statutes, defences and proposals for reform of the law. The second aspect of the law aims to introduce learners to police powers in relation to the arrest, detention and questioning of those suspected of committing a criminal offence, and the rights of those suspects. The unit considers how police officers carry out a legal arrest, the general arrest conditions and the consequences of these not being met. Learners will look at the time limits for detention and how these may be extended, the conduct of police interviews and the rights of a detained person while in police custody. This area of the law is largely governed by the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 and the codes of practice made under that Act.

Unit 5: Aspects of Property Offences and Police Powers – In this unit a range of property offences are investigated, together with some defences and their effects. The first group of offences relate to theft, robbery (effectively theft with violence) and burglary (which involves theft or other offences in a building). The detailed definitions of these offences given in the Theft Act 1968 are considered. The second group of offences relate to fraud under the Fraud Act 2006. This limited range concentrates on offences that have been brought into the new 2006 Act. Also considered are those offences under the Criminal Damage Act 1971. The distinction between basic criminal damage and criminal damage with intent to endanger life is examined. Arson is also examined. You will also investigate police powers regarding the searching of people and premises. This covers regulations regarding the stop and search of people and the entry into premises, both with and without a warrant. Learners will also consider the consequences of unlawful entry and searches.

Unit 6: Contract Law – will consider the rules governing contracts from formation through to completion. On the issue of formation, learners need to know exactly when a contract and its obligations become legal. Often one party believes there is a contract when there isn’t, and vice versa. Sometimes one party to the contract will make incorrect statements about the subject matter. These statements may be a misrepresentation which could give rise to remedies including ending the contract. The law on misrepresentation is explored through the unit together with an outline of other matters that might make a contract voidable or void.

Assessment: 100% coursework which is marked internally and externally moderated to confirm the accuracy of marking.

This course finishes at the end of the 2016-17 academic year.

Further information about the course is available at www.edexcel.org.uk