English – MYP

DoL: Ciara Cardiff
2iC: Lillian Drysdale

Middle Years English Programme

Curriculum Intent

In Year 7 our students are introduced to Year 1 of Language and Literature curriculum within the International Bachelorette’s Middle Years Programme. Students will focus on a variety of texts from different time periods and geographical locations. These texts are intended to help our students become more open and critically minded about the world around them and their place within it. The themes Year 7 students focus on are: Journeys/Growth, Identity and Belonging, Internal Conflict and “The Other’’.  

Much of our work originates in and leads to students developing their ability to communicate confidently and clearly through a range of individual and collaborative tasks; students are taught to use Standard English from Year 7. Using these texts we nurture students’ personal and collaborative development through their linguistic competence through writing in a variety of forms for a range of purposes and audiences, and to increase their awareness of the writing process itself – from planning to proofreading and correction. A strong emphasis is placed upon linguistic and structural text conventions and upon the accuracy and presentation of written work. The rigour and diversity of the work in these early years provides a solid foundation continuing the MYP programme and for examination in English Language and English Literature in Key Stage 4. Students can be helped to develop emotionally and intellectually through reading, and we encourage them to establish, from Year 7, a habit of regular and independent reading for pleasure. All students in Year 7, follow the Accelerated Reader Intervention Programme. We teach our students how to understand and evaluate the author’s craft and how to make an informed personal response to what they read. We aim to develop students’ ability to read, enjoy and analyse a wide range of texts: contemporary and classic literary texts from a variety of cultures and traditions, non-literary texts and moving image texts. Students are taught how to read for different purposes and to understand the way meanings are made. Equal Opportunities issues are addressed through reading, and we aim to encourage empathy so that each student approaches issues of race, culture, gender, ability and disability with tolerance and insight.

Schedule of Learning

  • Module 1: A Long Walk to Water by Linda Sue Park 
  • Module 2: Frankenstein by Mary Shelley (play adaptation by Phillip Pullman)
  • Module 3: The Little Prince by Antoine de St. Exupery 
  • Module 4: Whadja by Haifaa al Mansour (Film) 
  • Module 5: Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J.K. Rowling 
  • Module 6: Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J.K. Rowling (continued)

Implementation

Students will read

  • At least one translated text 
  • At least one contemporary text
  • At least one 19th Century text 
  • At least text from another country

Writing

  • Producing clear and coherent text: writing effectively about literature for a range of purposes such as: to describe, explain, summarise, argue, analyse and evaluate; discussing and maintaining a point of view; selecting and emphasize key points; using relevant quotation and using detailed textual references
  • Accurate Standard English: accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar.

Reading comprehension and reading critically

  • Literal and inferential comprehension: understanding a word, phrase or sentence in context; exploring aspects of plot, characterisation,
  • Events and settings; distinguishing between what is stated explicitly and what is implied/inferred; explaining motivation, sequence of events,and the relationship between actions or events
  • Critical reading: identifying the theme and distinguishing between themes; supporting a point of view by referring to evidence in the text;
  • Recognising the possibility of and evaluating different responses to a text; using understanding of writers’ social, historical and cultural contexts to inform evaluation; making an informed personal response that derives from analysis and evaluation of the text
  • Evaluation of a writer’s choice of vocabulary, grammatical and structural features: analysing and evaluating how language (including figurative language), structure, form and presentation contribute to quality and impact; 
  • Using linguistic and literary terminology for such evaluation (such as, but not restricted to, phrase, metaphor, meter, irony and persona, synecdoche, pathetic fallacy)
  • Comparing texts: comparing and contrasting texts studied, referring where relevant to theme, characterisation, context (where known),
  • Style and literary quality; comparing two texts critically with respect to the above.

Impact

Students will be supported with a number of different types of assessment materials to ensure they reach their full potential in their first year using the Year 1 Criterion within the MYP Program. They will be assessed for each criteria twice throughout the academic year: 

  • Criterion A- Analysing 
  • Criterion B- Organising 
  • Criterion C- Producing Text 
  • Criterion D- Using Language 

The four MYP criteria will be summatively assessed and reported on twice a year (Modules 3 and 6). A final grade will be provided at the end of the year (Module 6).

Curriculum Intent

In Year 8 our students continue their second year of the Language and Literature curriculum within the International Bachelorette’s Middle Years Programme. Students continue to explore a variety of texts from different time periods and geographical locations. These texts are intended to broaden our students’ perspectives, helping them to question the world around them and their place within it. The themes Year 8 students focus on are: Conflict, Responsibility, The Roles of Power, Change/Becoming’.  

Much of our work originates in and leads to students developing their ability to communicate confidently and clearly through a range of individual and collaborative tasks; students are taught to use Standard English from Year 7 and continue this in Year 8. Using these texts we nurture students’ personal and collaborative development through their linguistic competence through writing in a variety of forms for a range of purposes and audiences, and to increase their awareness of the writing process itself – from planning to proofreading and correction. A strong emphasis is placed upon linguistic and structural text conventions and upon the accuracy and presentation of written work. The rigour and diversity of the work in these early years provides a solid foundation continuing the MYP programme and for examination in English Language and English Literature in Key Stage 4. Students can be helped to develop emotionally and intellectually through reading, and we encourage them to establish, from Year 7, a habit of regular and independent reading for pleasure. All students in Year 8 still follow the Accelerated Reader Intervention Programme. We teach our students how to understand and evaluate the author’s craft and how to make an informed personal response to what they read. We aim to develop students’ ability to read, enjoy and analyse a wide range of texts: contemporary and classic literary texts from a variety of cultures and traditions, non-literary texts and moving image texts. Students are taught how to read for different purposes and to understand the way meanings are made. Equal Opportunities issues are addressed through reading, and we aim to encourage empathy so that each student approaches issues of race, culture, gender, ability and disability with tolerance and insight.

Schedule of Learning

  • Module 1: Private Peaceful by Michael Morpurgo
  • Module 2: Private Peaceful by Michael Morpurgo (continued) 
  • Module 3: The Tempest by William Shakespeare 
  • Module 4: The Giver by Lois Lowry 
  • Module 5: The Giver by Lois Lowry (continued)
  • Module 6: Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds

Students will read

  • At least one Shakespearean text 
  • At least one contemporary text 
  • At least text from another country 
  • One dystopian genre text 
  • One unit of poetry as prose

Writing

  • Producing clear and coherent text: writing effectively about literature for a range of purposes such as: to describe, explain, summarise, argue, analyse and evaluate; discussing and maintaining a point of view; selecting and emphasize key points; using relevant quotation and using detailed textual references
  • Accurate Standard English: accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar.

Reading comprehension and reading critically

  • Literal and inferential comprehension: understanding a word, phrase or sentence in context; exploring aspects of plot, characterisation,
  • Events and settings; distinguishing between what is stated explicitly and what is implied/inferred; explaining motivation, sequence of events,and the relationship between actions or events
  • Critical reading: identifying the theme and distinguishing between themes; supporting a point of view by referring to evidence in the text;
  • Recognising the possibility of and evaluating different responses to a text; using understanding of writers’ social, historical and cultural
  • Contexts to inform evaluation; making an informed personal response that derives from analysis and evaluation of the text
  • Evaluation of a writer’s choice of vocabulary, grammatical and structural features: analysing and evaluating how language (including figurative language), structure, form and presentation contribute to quality and impact; 
  • Using linguistic and literary terminology for such evaluation (such as, but not restricted to, phrase, metaphor, meter, irony and persona, synecdoche, pathetic fallacy)
  • Comparing texts: comparing and contrasting texts studied, referring where relevant to theme, characterisation, context (where known),
  • Style and literary quality; comparing two texts critically with respect to the above.

Impact

Students will be supported with a number of different types of assessment materials to ensure they reach their full potential in their second year using the Year 1 Criterion within the MYP Program. They will be assessed for each criteria twice throughout the academic year: 

  • Criterion A- Analysing 
  • Criterion B- Organising 
  • Criterion C- Producing Text 
  • Criterion D- Using Language 

The four MYP criteria will be summatively assessed and reported on twice a year (Modules 3 and 6). A final grade will be provided at the end of the year (Module 6).

Curriculum Intent

In Year 9 our students complete their third year and final of the Language and Literature curriculum within the International Bachelorette’s Middle Years Programme before commencing their GCSE studies. Students continue to explore a variety of texts from different time periods and geographical locations. These texts are intended to broaden our students’ perspectives, helping them to question the world around them and their place within it. The themes Year 9 students focus on are: Relationships, Oppression/Equality, Stereotypes/Fairness and Growing Up.  

Much of our work originates in and leads to students developing their ability to communicate confidently and clearly through a range of individual and collaborative tasks; students are taught to use Standard English from Year 7 and continue this into Year 9. Using these texts we nurture students’ personal and collaborative development through their linguistic competence through writing in a variety of forms for a range of purposes and audiences, and to increase their awareness of the writing process itself – from planning to proofreading and correction. A strong emphasis is placed upon linguistic and structural text conventions and upon the accuracy and presentation of written work. The rigour and diversity of the work in these early years provides a solid foundation continuing the MYP programme and for examination in English Language and English Literature in Key Stage 4. Students can be helped to develop emotionally and intellectually through reading, and we encourage them to establish, from Year 7, a habit of regular and independent reading for pleasure. We teach our students how to understand and evaluate the author’s craft and how to make an informed personal response to what they read. We aim to develop students’ ability to read, enjoy and analyse a wide range of texts: contemporary and classic literary texts from a variety of cultures and traditions, non-literary texts and moving image texts. Students are taught how to read for different purposes and to understand the way meanings are made. Equal Opportunities issues are addressed through reading, and we aim to encourage empathy so that each student approaches issues of race, culture, gender, ability and disability with tolerance and insight.

Schedule of Learning

  • Module 1: Night by Elie Wiesel 
  • Module 2: Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare 
  • Module 3: TBA
  • Module 4: Boy Don’t Cry by Malorie Blackman
  • Module 5: Boy Don’t Cry by Malorie Blackman (continued) 
  • Module 6: Relationships Poetry Anthology – various poets from 18th century to contemporary (continued) 

Implementation

Students will read

  • At least one Shakespearean text 
  • At least one translated text 
  • At least one contemporary text 
  • At least text from another country 
  • At least one unit of poetry genre

Writing

  • Producing clear and coherent text: writing effectively about literature for a range of purposes such as: to describe, explain, summarise, argue, analyse and evaluate; discussing and maintaining a point of view; selecting and emphasize key points; using relevant quotation and using detailed textual references
  • Accurate Standard English: accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar.

Reading comprehension and reading critically

  • Literal and inferential comprehension: understanding a word, phrase or sentence in context; exploring aspects of plot, characterisation,
  • Events and settings; distinguishing between what is stated explicitly and what is implied/inferred; explaining motivation, sequence of events,and the relationship between actions or events
  • Critical reading: identifying the theme and distinguishing between themes; supporting a point of view by referring to evidence in the text;
  • Recognising the possibility of and evaluating different responses to a text; using understanding of writers’ social, historical and cultural
  • Contexts to inform evaluation; making an informed personal response that derives from analysis and evaluation of the text
  • Evaluation of a writer’s choice of vocabulary, grammatical and structural features: analysing and evaluating how language (including figurative language), structure, form and presentation contribute to quality and impact; 
  • Using linguistic and literary terminology for such evaluation (such as, but not restricted to, phrase, metaphor, meter, irony and persona, synecdoche, pathetic fallacy)
  • Comparing texts: comparing and contrasting texts studied, referring where relevant to theme, characterisation, context (where known),
  • Style and literary quality; comparing two texts critically with respect to the above.

Impact

Students will be supported with a number of different types of assessment materials to ensure they reach their full potential in their third and final year using the Year 2 Criterion within the MYP Program. They will be assessed for each criteria twice throughout the academic year: 

  • Criterion A- Analysing 
  • Criterion B- Organising 
  • Criterion C- Producing Text 
  • Criterion D- Using Language 

The four MYP criteria will be summatively assessed and reported on twice a year (Modules 3 and 6). A final grade will be provided at the end of the year (Module 6).