Key Stage 4 Subject Information

Art

Art Coordinator: Ms. Sampson (Email

Intent

At Key Stage 4, art is taught in mixed ability option groups. Students study the BTEC Level 2 Tech Award in Art and Design Practice. 

Students studying the BTEC will learn the features and techniques of a wide range of material and techniques and how they are practically applied. They will learn how to generate ideas within art and design through their understanding of art movements and styles. They will also learn how to assess and develop their existing practical skills and how to put in place a plan for development and final outcome. 

The learning aims of the course encompass the investigation of art and design practice as well as the ability to generate and communicate art and design ideas. They also focus on the development of skills through application and review as well as the ability to record and communicate their skills development. 

 Each learning aim is broken down into specific grading criteria and together these learning aims reflect the knowledge, skills and attitudes that students need in order to develop, create or evaluate artwork in a variety of styles and contexts.

Schedule of Learning:

Module 1-2: Component 1 – Exploring the elements of art and styles/Generating Ideas 

Module 3-5: Component 1: Generating Ideas in Art and Design 

Module 6: Component 2 – Visual Arts skills development

Implementation

Students will be able to gain the necessary knowledge and understanding whilst applying this knowledge within their practical works though practical experimentation and reflection. They will have access to specific artwork resources including an A3 sketchbook, fine art materials and editing software that will enable them to develop their work further. 

Impact

BTEC Art and Design aims to equip all students with the knowledge, understanding and skills to address further courses in Art and Design, as well as specific workplaces that are related to the Art and Design industry. The structure of the course equips students with necessary professional and personal skills that could be transferred to any workplace environment. Also, the focus on developing creative behaviours has wide ranging benefits to future careers and enables students to be critical thinkers, innovators and reflective practitioners.

Students will be assessed under component learning aims.

For Component 1, these are:

  • Learning Aim A: Investigate art and design practice 
  • Learning Aim B: Generate and communicate art and design ideas

For Component 2, these are:

  • Learning Aim A: Develop skills through application and review 
  • Learning Aim B: Record and communicate skills development

Each learning aim is broken down into grading criteria. The grading criteria for each learning aim describe a range of student performance from the lowest grade to the highest. From the lowest to the highest the grades go as follows:

  • Level 1 Pass
  • Level 1 Merit
  • Level 2 Pass
  • Level 2 Merit
  • Level 2 Distinction

The students will be summatively assessed every module from module 2-6 based on the current component or coursework being undertaken at that time. For more information, please read our assessment recording and reporting cycle.

Exam Board Information:

Additional Resources:

MYP subject guide links

MYP assessment criterion

Exam board links

Useful websites

Learning Journeys/Knowledge Organiser Links

Distance Learning Links

Enterprise

DOL: Mr. M Hellyer (Email)

Subject Leader: Mr. M Hellyer (Email)

Intent

All businesses need enterprising employees to drive their organisations forward, to have ideas and initiatives to instigate growth, and to ensure that businesses survive in this fast-changing world. Enterprise is a key government focus and is set to form an important part of the UK’s global economic status, both now and in the future. Enterprise skills provide a fantastic progression pathway into a number of roles in an organisation and are transferable into all businesses.

Schedule of Learning:

Module 1: Component 3 – Promotion and Finance for Enterprise

Learning Aim A: Promotion

A1 Elements of the promotional mix and their purposes

A2 Targeting and segmenting the market

A3 Factors influencing the choice of promotional methods

Module 2: Component 3 – Promotion and Finance for Enterprise

Learning Aim B: Financial records

B1 Financial documents 

B2 Payment methods 

B3 Sources of revenue and costs 

B4 Terminology in financial statements

B5 Statement of comprehensive income

B6 Statement of financial position 

B7 Profitability and liquidity  

Module 3: Component 3 – Promotion and Finance for Enterprise

Learning Aim C: Financial planning and forecasting

C1 Using cash flow data

C2 Financial forecasting 

C3 Suggesting improvements to cash flow problems 

C4 Break-even analysis and break-even point 

C5 Sources of business finance 

Module 4: Component 2- Planning for and Pitching an Enterprise Activity

Learning aim A: Explore ideas and plan for a micro-enterprise activity

A1 Generating ideas for a micro-enterprise activity

A2 Plan for a micro-enterprise activity  

Module 5: Component 2- Planning for and Pitching an Enterprise Activity

Learning aim B: Pitch a micro-enterprise activity

B1 Pitching a micro-enterprise activity

B2 Presenting a business pitch

Module 6: Component 2- Planning for and Pitching an Enterprise Activity

Learning aim C: Review own pitch for a micro-enterprise activity

C1 Using feedback and review to identify possible changes to the pitch 

Implementation

What is an Enterprise? You will explore why enterprises are successful, looking at the impact of factors both inside and outside the control of the enterprise, and investigate ways in which situational analysis can be used to support decision making. You will discover how success can be monitored in a small or medium Enterprise (SME). This component will give you an understanding of the factors that contribute to a successful enterprise. 

You will also use the research to consider a number of ideas before developing a plan for a realistic micro-enterprise activity. You will have the opportunity to plan how best to set up the chosen enterprise and how to fund it. You will need to take responsibility for creating and then delivering a pitch for your developed idea to an audience using your knowledge of business, and demonstrating entrepreneurial characteristics, qualities and skills.

Finally you will assess and analyse financial information in an enterprise context to monitor the performance of an enterprise and strategies to improve its performance. You will investigate cash flow forecasts and statements, exploring the effects that positive and negative cash flow can have on an enterprise, and suggesting ways to improve them. You will consider the different elements of the promotional mix in order to be able to identify target markets and put forward strategies that enterprises can use to increase their success in the future.

Impact

This course provides you with the opportunity to develop sector-specific knowledge and skills in a practical learning environment. The main focus is on the knowledge, understanding and skills required to research, plan, pitch and review an enterprise idea that includes:

  • development of key skills that prove aptitude in planning an enterprise activity, including market research, planning, carrying out financial transactions, communication and problem solving 
  • knowledge that underpins effective use of skills, such as the features and characteristics of enterprises and entrepreneurs, and the internal and external factors that can affect the performance of an enterprise 
  • attitudes and ways of working that are considered most important for enterprise, including monitoring and reflecting on performance of an enterprise idea and own use of skills.

Assessment

Two internally assessed components of work (worth 30% each) , one externally assessed examination (component 3, worth 40%) There will be a second opportunity to sit the examination in year 11 if necessary. Internal assessment is externally moderated to ensure accuracy of marking. 

Students are graded for each component as Level 1 Pass, Level 1 Merit, Level 2 Pass, Level 2 Merit or Level 2 Distinction depending on the quality of coursework and marks achieved in the examination. Each grade is weighted in terms of points and the combined points from the three components determine their overall performance raging from Level 1 Pass upto and including a Distinction* (equivalent GCSE grade 7).

Exam Board Information

Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 Tech Award in Enterprise (Equivalent to 1 GCSE)

Further information is available at www.qualifications.pearson.com/en/home.html

Additional Resources:

Google Classroom

Course Specification

Knowledge Organisers

BTEC Tech Award Enterprise Student Book 2nd edition ISBN 978-1292279343

Revise BTEC Tech Award Enterprise Revision Guide ISBN 978-12922456

Drama

Subject Leader: Miss. P. Wild (Email)

Intent

This course is for learners who want to acquire technical knowledge and technical skills through vocational contexts by studying acting, as part of their Key Stage 4 learning. The qualification recognises the value of learning skills, knowledge and vocational attributes to complement GCSEs. The qualification will broaden the learners experience and understanding of the varied progression options available to them. The Award gives learners the opportunity to develop sector-specific knowledge and skills in a practical learning environment. Over the course of the two years pupils will study three components. 

Assessment

Components 1 and 2 are assessed through internal assessment. Internal assessment for these components has been designed to relate to achievement of application of the conceptual underpinning for the sector through realistic tasks and activities. This style of assessment promotes deep learning through ensuring the connection between knowledge and practice. 

Implementation

Component 1: Exploring the Performing Arts

To develop as a performer pupils  will need a broad understanding of performance work and influences. This component will help students to understand the requirements of being a performer across a range of performances and performance styles. Pupils will look at elements such as roles, responsibilities and the application of relevant skills and techniques. Learners will broaden their knowledge through observing existing repertoire and by learning about the approaches of practitioners, and how they create and influence performance material.

Component 2: Developing Skills and Techniques in the Performing Arts

Working as a performer requires the application of skills, techniques and practices that enables students  to produce and interpret performance work. Pupils will communicate intentions to an audience through a variety of disciplines such as through performing or designing in any performance style from acting, In this component, pupils will develop performing or design skills and techniques.Throughout the students development, they will review their own progress and consider how to make improvements.

Impact

This is evidenced through the encouraging exam results at BTEC 100% achievement for grades 4-9. (2020)

The impact is also evident in the future destinations of our students. Many of our students continue with their passion for Drama by studying Drama at further education.

Further information about the course is available here.

English

DoL: Ciara Cardiff
2iC: Lillian Drysdale

Curriculum Intent: 

We aim to nurture students’ personal development and linguistic competence through writing in a variety of forms for a range of purposes and audiences, and to increase their awareness of the writing process itself – from planning to proofreading and correction. A strong emphasis is placed upon linguistic and structural text conventions and upon the accuracy and presentation of written work. We also aim to promote the development of students’ evaluation and analysis skills to encourage critical thinking in order to study literature in depth and investigate authorial intent. Students are provided with the opportunity to explore different genres of texts from different time periods. Students will develop an understanding of context and be able to discuss the links between their studied texts and the context in which they were written. 

Schedule of Learning:

  • Module 1:Shakespearean Text – Macbeth 
  • Module 2:  19th Century text – The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde or A Christmas Carol 
  • Module 3: Post 1914 British Text – An Inspector Calls
  • Module 4: Anthology Poetry 
  • Module 5: Unseen Poetry and Full Literature Revision 
  • Module 6: Introduction to English Language and completion of the Spoken Language Endorsement

Implementation:

Reading comprehension and reading critically

  • Literal and inferential comprehension: understanding a word, phrase or sentence in context; exploring aspects of plot, characterisation, events and settings; distinguishing between what is stated explicitly and what is implied; explaining motivation, sequence of events, and the relationship between actions or events.
  • Critical reading: identifying the theme and distinguishing between themes; supporting a point of view by referring to evidence in the text; recognising the possibility of and evaluating different responses to a text; using understanding of writers’ social, historical and cultural contexts to inform evaluation; making an informed personal response that derives from analysis and evaluation of the text
  • Evaluation of a writer’s choice of vocabulary, grammatical and structural features: analysing and evaluating how language (including figurative language), structure, form and presentation contribute to quality and impact; using linguistic and literary terminology for such evaluation (such as, but not restricted to, phrase, metaphor, meter, irony and persona, synecdoche, pathetic fallacy)
  • Comparing texts: comparing and contrasting texts studied, referring where relevant to theme, characterisation, context (where known),
  • Style and literary quality; comparing two texts critically with respect to the above.

Writing

    • Producing clear and coherent text: writing effectively about literature for a range of purposes such as: to describe, explain, summarise, argue, analyse and evaluate; discussing and maintaining a point of view; selecting and emphasising key points; using relevant quotation  and using detailed textual references
    • Accurate Standard English: accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar. In addition, learners are required to study the following content:
      • at least one play by Shakespeare
      • at least one 19th century novel
  • a selection of poetry since 1789, including representative Romantic poetry
    • fiction or drama from the British Isles from 1914 onwards.

Impact:

Students will be supported with a number of different types of assessment materials to ensure they reach their full potential in their English Literature GCSE examination. Students will develop their critical thinking, analysis and evaluation skills through different literature texts. Students will complete a full Literature mock at the end of year 10. 

  • GCSE Literature: 100% Examination (Edexcel Exam Board)

 

Geography

DOL: Miss. Hawkins (Email)

Intent

Our aim is to provide students with a curriculum that is engaging, but also develops students as world citizens.  As outlined by Michael Palin ‘So many of the world’s current issues – at a global scale and locally – boil down to geography, and need the geographers of the future to help us understand them’. It is therefore our aim, to not only develop students’ love for the subject, but also their ability to solve the world’s current issues. 

Students in Year 10 follow the AQA Geography specification, which enables students to develop knowledge of key human and physical geography, underpinned through local and global case studies and fieldwork. 

Student on this course and provided with fundamental skills and knowledge to help them succeed within Post 16 courses and beyond. 

Schedule of Learning as of 2021/22:

Students begin to study for both Paper 1 and Paper 2 of their GCSE. Within this year, students will focus on the following topics. 

Tectonic Hazards: Key processes at the plate boundaries, case studies of both rich and poor countries, focusing on the causes, effects and responses to earthquakes.

Weather Hazards: Students focus on developing knowledge on where tropical storms form. Case studies of both rich and poor countries are focused upon, exploring the causes, effects and responses to tropical storms.

Climate Change: Students develop knowledge on what is causing climate change, what the impacts are and how we can reduce the effects of climate change on both a personal level as well as on a large scale. 

Changing Urban Environments: Students explore the reasons why urban areas are growing. Students focus on Mumbai, a slum within India, the causes of growth, the effects of growth and also how it can be managed. Students also explore London, focusing on why it has grown, the impacts of this growth and how this can be managed sustainably. 

Changing Economic World: Students explore how countries are at different levels of development and why. Knowledge is gained on how countries are helped to ensure that they develop, exploring the positives and negatives of this. A large focus is also on the economy of the UK, how it has changed and the impact that this has had on the country.  

The Living World: Students explore tropical rainforests, with a focus on Malaysia. Students focus on the causes, effects and responses to deforestation. Within this topic, students also study a hot desert, focusing on their uses, the impacts of using deserts and also opportunities and challenges for development. 

Resource Management: Students explore how resources are distributed around the world, which is underpinned by the idea that it is not equal. Students then focus on food, exploring how some countries suffer from obesity, and how some suffer from malnutrition. A key focus is on how to ensure that everyone in the world has access to enough food. 

Rivers: Students develop an awareness of key processes that occur along rivers, working through each course of the river. Students also explore how these key processes can be managed.  Students explore the effects of these processes and management systems on people and the environment. Students are given opportunities to conduct fieldwork with the department, to see this topic in action. 

Coastal Landscapes: Students develop an awareness of key processes that take place at the coastline. Students also explore how these key processes can be managed.  Students explore the effects of these processes and management systems on people and the environment. Students will also work towards their Paper 3 exam during this topic, where they will complete fieldwork in Hastings.

Implementation

GCSE Geography provides students with the opportunity to develop a breadth of Geographical knowledge, exploring both local and global case studies. Students focus on how the world we live in is affected by natural and human processes and the consequences of this. Students also develop knowledge on key geographical processes such as River and Coastal landscapes. A key focus is fieldwork, with students given the opportunity to undertake both human and physical fieldwork in contrasting locations. 

Impact

Assessment at GCSE is balanced between summative and formative assessment. Students are assessed at the end of each topic, given past exam papers to test knowledge, build their confidence and practice exam techniques taught in class. Students are assessed under the following Assessment objectives:

AO1: Demonstrate knowledge of locations, places, processes, environments and different scales (15%). 

AO2: Demonstrate geographic understanding of: concepts and how they are used in relation to places, environments and processes; the interrelationships between places, environments and processes (25%)

AO3: Apply knowledge and understanding to interpret, analyse and evaluate geographical information and issues to make judgements (35%, including 10% applied to fieldwork context)

AO4: Select, adapt and use a variety of skills and techniques to investigate questions and issues and communicate findings (25%, including 5% used to respond to fieldwork data and context(s)

Students sit three exam papers at the end of Year 11

Paper 1- Living with the Physical Environment – 1hr 30 minutes- 88 marks 

Paper 2- Challenges in the human environment – 1 hr 30 minutes – 88 marks 

Paper 3- Geographical Applications- 1hr 15 minutes- 76 marks 

Students will receive reports in Year 10 during Module 2,4 and 6, where attitude to learning, a current working grade and a predicted grade will be provided. Both current working grade and predicted grades will be based on end of topic tests and how well the students have performed in these. 

https://wilmingtonacademy.org.uk/curriculum-and-assessment/assessment-recording-and-reporting/

Exam Board Information

Specification

Additional Resources:

Knowledge Organisers

Online Learning

Health & Social Care

Coordinator: Ms. Vanhorne (Email)

Subject Leader: Ms. Vanhorne (Email)

Intent

The intent of the department curriculum is to ensure that all students acquire the skills, knowledge and interdependence required to work in this industry. Students are supported and encouraged to take responsibility for their own learning and develop skills that are essential for the modern-day workplace. Students are academically challenged through the broadness of the curriculum and a range of real-life scenarios which is aimed to prepare them for the future. We offer the BTEC Level 2 course at Key Stage 4, this course offers a clear assessment programme which gives students the opportunity to independently strive to achieve their full potential. The course gives students an insight into the skills and qualities required to work in a health and social care setting.

Schedule of Learning:

Module 1: Component 1 – Human Lifespan Development 

Learning Aim A – Understand human growth and development across life stages and the factors that affect it 

A1 Human growth and development across life stages

A2 Factors affecting growth and development 

– Infancy, childhood, early/middle/older adulthood 

– Physical, intellectual, social, emotional development 

– Factors that affect development

Module 2: Component 1 – Human Lifespan Development 

Learning Aim B: Investigate how individuals deal with life events 

B1 Different types of life event

B2 Coping with change caused by life events

– Physical, relationship, life circumstances events 

– How people react differently to events – Types of support available

Module 3: Component 1 – Human Lifespan Development 

Course work (LAA): – Outline, explain, compare and assess the changing impact of different factors in the growth and development across three life stages of a selected individual.

Module 4: Component 1 – Human Lifespan Development 

Course work (LAB) – Outline, explain, compare and assess how well two individuals adapted to a life event and the role and value of support.

Module 5: Component 2- Health and Social Care Services and Values

Learning aim A: Understand the different types of health and social care services and barriers to accessing them

A1 Health and social care services

A2 Barriers to accessing services

– Primary, secondary, tertiary care 

– Services available 

Module 6: Component 2 –  Health and Social Care Services and Values             

Coursework (LAA) – Outline, explain, analyse and assess the suitability of health and social care services for individuals, making justified and realistic suggestions for how barriers can be overcome.                 

Component 3: Health and wellbeing 

Learning Aim A – Factors that affect health and wellbeing

Health 

– Genetics 

– Environment

Implementation

At KS4, students develop an understanding of ‘human life span development’, and the importance of ‘health and social care values in the sector’. Students will develop vocabulary and knowledge through role-plays and case studies. All students will be registered to complete the Level 2 BTEC Tech Award in Health and Social Care which consist of three mandatory components. 

Impact

The impact of the BTEC Health and Social Care Curriculum can be measured in terms of the increase in the number of students progressing from Level 2 to 3. Engagement, progress attainment as evidenced through coursework and exam results. Raising aspirations through increased awareness and understanding of a range of Health and Social Care careers and entry routes. This subject also provides pathways into a wide variety of career options including nursing, teaching and education, social care, and provides access to numerous apprenticeships and study options within the NHS. 

Assessment

Two internally assessed components of work (worth 30% each) , one externally assessed examination (component 3, worth 40%) There will be a second opportunity to sit the examination in year 11 if necessary. Internal assessment is externally moderated to ensure accuracy of marking. 

Students are graded for each component as Level 1 Pass, Level 1 Merit, Level 2 Pass, Level 2 Merit or Level 2 Distinction depending on the quality of coursework and marks achieved in the examination. Each grade is weighted in terms of points and the combined points from the three components determine their overall performance raging from Level 1 Pass upto and including a Distinction* (equivalent GCSE grade 7).

Exam Board Information

Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 Tech Award in Health and Social Care (Equivalent to 1 GCSE)

Further information is available at www.qualifications.pearson.com/en/home.html

https://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/btec-tech-awards/health-and-social-care.html

Additional Resources:

Google Classroom

Course Specification

Knowledge Organisers

Online Learning

BTEC Tech Award Health and Social Care Student Book ISBN 

Revise BTEC Tech Health and Social Care Revision Guide ISBN 

History

Individuals and Societies- History
History Coordinator: Miss Youdale

Intent

Our aim is to provide an engaging and inclusive History curriculum that allows all students to reach their full potential, develop a love of learning and understand how important history is to the world they live in today. As Marcus Garvey stated, “A person without knowledge of their past history, origin, and culture is like a tree without roots”. It is more important than ever to understand the events of the past, to engage in critical evaluation of sources and to make historical judgements.  Students gain the opportunity to travel through the past, learn why the world is the way it is today and become inquisitive, globally aware citizens. 

The History curriculum allows students to retain vital substantive knowledge, focus on second order concepts and master essential historical enquiry through source analysis, Interpretations and critical thinking. We want to equip our students with a curiosity of the world around them. The department focuses on a number of historical events and themes, from Migration over time, the rise of 20th century dictators across the globe, the British Empire as well as the key components of the National Curriculum such as what Britain was like before 1066, the Holocaust and a local study of dartford soldiers during WW1. 

Within the MYP, GCSE and IB curriculum, students are encouraged to reflect on the highs and lows of the past and use this to consider their role within society today. Our curriculum is constantly reviewed to ensure that it meets the National Curriculum, the needs of our current students and shapes them to be well rounded individuals that are knowledgeable and able to analyse and think independently about the world around them. 

Schedule of Learning as of 2021/22

  • Module 1: Paper 1 – Medicine in Britain, c.1250-present (Medieval and Renaissance Medicine)
  • Module 2: Paper 1 – Medicine in Britain, c.1250-present (C18th & C19th and Modern Medicine)
  • Module 3: Paper 1 – Medicine in Britain, c.1250-present (British Sector of the Western Front & Exam Focus)
  • Module 4: Paper 3: Weimar and Nazi Germany, 1918-939 (The Weimar Republic 1918-29 and Hitler’s rise to power, 1919-33)
  • Module 5: Paper 3: Weimar and Nazi Germany, 1918-939 (Nazi control and dictatorship, 1933-39 and Life in Nazi Germany, 1933-39)
  • Module 6: Paper 3: Weimar and Nazi Germany, 1918-939 (Consolidation of knowledge and exam skills)

Implementation

For MYP History, our unit plans are based on ensuring full coverage of the National Curriculum through the use of the MYP and embedded IB philosophy. The department puts a great emphasis on KS3 as we give students the opportunity to research and investigate topics within History and be independent and conscientious with their approach to the work they produce. We have a student-led History Society that is centred around the topics that interest the students to ensure that they continue to develop a lifelong love of learning and experience learning in a different environment. 

Impact

The breadth and depth of the History curriculum will ensure that all students can be challenged in developing the disciplinary and substantive knowledge needed for them to be successful. This will ensure that they have the ability to access the next step in their education and in their lives. Skills include evaluating sources, weighing up evidence, determining the reliability of contemporary sources, debating and presenting both sides of an argument, analysing historical interpretations, student led enquiry and developing key literacy and numeracy skills, which are important not just for our subject but across multiple disciplines. This is evident in our excellent exam results at GCSE level, where our students achieved above national average, as well as IB grades in which 100% of students achieved a grade 5 or above. Students have gone on to pursue their passion for History at university level as well as other students being able to use their skills to gain apprenticeships in other sectors. 

We use the following Assessment Objectives

  • A01: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key features and characteristics of the periods studied. (35%)
  • A02: Explain and analyse historical events and periods studied using second-order historical concepts. (35%)
  • A03: Analyse, evaluate and use sources (contemporary to the period) to make substantiated judgements, in the context of historical events studied. (15%)
  • A04: Analyse, evaluate and make substantiated judgements about interpretations (including how and why interpretations may differ) in the context of historical events studied. (15%)

Students sit three exams on four units at the end of Year 11

  • Paper 1 – Medicine in Britain, c.1250-present  – 1 hour 15 minutes (30%) 52 marks
  • Paper 2 – Superpower Relations and the Cold War, 1941-1991 and Anglo-Saxon and Norman England, c.1060-1088 – 1 hour 45 minutes (40%) 64 marks
  • Paper 3 – Weimar and Nazi Germany, 1918-1939 1 hour 20 minutes (30%) 52 marks

Exam board information

Edexcel GCSE (9-1) History Specification

Additional resources

Year 10 History Knowledge Organisers

Distance Learning Website

BBC Bitesize GCSE Edexcel History – The Normans

Seneca Learning

ICT - Digital Design

DOL: Mr. Marriott (Email)

Subject Leader: Mr. Haciosman (Email)

Intent

Computing and ICT plays a key part in the education of all children. Society demands a required use of technology, and therefore it is imperative it is taught well within Wilmington Academy. 

Students at Wilmington have the opportunity to apply and develop their technological understanding and skills to empower them to interact with technology and any issues outside of education. A rich Digital Information Technology curriculum equips students to use computational thinking, creativity and practical skills to adapt to the ever changing digital society we live in. 

The digital sector is a major source of employment in the UK. Around 1.46 million people work in digital companies and there are around 45,000 digital jobs advertised at any one time. Digital skills span all industries, and almost all jobs in the UK today require employees to have a good level of digital literacy. The UK has positioned itself to be the ‘Digital capital of Europe’ as it continues to invest billions every year in digital skills and commerce. The modern world expects digital skills to be as important as English and Maths. Having both technical skills and business understanding is the key to success. (See Statement of Purpose for more details)

Schedule of Learning:

Module 1: Spreadsheets

Module 2: Interfaces

Module 3: Project Planning – Cloud Computing

Module 4: Modern Technologies – Systems Security

Module 5: 

Module 6: 

Implementation

You will be assessed across three components as shown below. Two of these will be assessed on internally set and marked coursework (1 & 2), with the final component an externally set examination.

1 – Exploring User Interface Design Principles and Project Planning Techniques (Internal) 

2 – Collecting, Presenting and Interpreting Data (Internal) 

3 – Effective Digital Working Practices (External) 

In this qualification you will develop important technical skills in data interpretation, data presentation and data protection. You will cover aspects of user interface (UI) design and development, and learn how to develop a project plan for your own UI designs. 

Cybercrime is an increasing threat – understanding the different types of threats and how to mitigate them is vital to any business that uses and retains sensitive data. You will develop an understanding of what cyber security is and the importance of legal and ethical considerations when using modern technologies.

Organisations often implement technological improvements by rolling out change projects, so understanding how projects are structured is of vital importance. This qualification will enable you to use project-planning tools, models and techniques within a digital context. Digital projects today often involve working with diverse teams across different locations. 

You will develop an understanding of what a virtual work environment is and how cloud technologies allow remote teams to work together more effectively. 

Impact

You will have developed a broad range of practical skills used in digital functions. The digital aspects covered within this qualification are not covered in the GCSE in Computer Science. This qualification will give you a sense of the type of skills, knowledge and behaviours required in the modern digital sector. This will allow you to decide whether the digital sector is for you and, if so, where your strengths lie. 

This course builds on and uses the knowledge and skills from GCSE Maths and English, and complements learning in other GCSE programmes, such as GCSE Design and Technology, and Computer Science, which could be taken alongside this qualification to further develop your digital skills. There are also a number of design aspects within the user interface element of this qualification that complement BTECs in Art & Design and Creative Media & Digital Production.

https://wilmingtonacademy.org.uk/curriculum-and-assessment/assessment-recording-and-reporting/

Additional Resources:

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

LINK

SCHEMES OF WORK

EXPLORING USER INTERFACE DESIGN AND PLANNING TECHNIQUES

EFFECTIVE DIGITAL WORKING PRACTICES

TWO YEAR OULTINE

BLENDED LEARNING APPROACH

Google Classroom Link to be assigned on sign up

Creative iMedia

DOL: Mr. Marriott (Email)

Subject Leaders: Mr. Reffold (Email)

Intent

Computing and ICT plays a key part in the education of all children. Society demands a required use of technology, and therefore it is imperative it is taught well within Wilmington Academy. 

Students at Wilmington have the opportunity to apply and develop their technological understanding and skills to empower them to interact with technology and any issues outside of education. A rich Digital Information Technology curriculum equips students to use computational thinking, creativity and practical skills to adapt to the ever changing digital society we live in. 

Creative Media allows students to display a distinctive creative mindset, and create content within a digital environment. The Creative Media course looks at content within Games, Publishing, Audio Publications, Video and Film and Web 2.0. Students will gain a rich knowledge of the tools, techniques, demographic targeting and technical work that goes into creating a digital product.

Schedule of Learning:

Module 1: R081 – Pre Production

Module 2: R081 – Pre Production – Examination techniques – Mock Examination – Examination (Jan)

Module 3: R082 – Creating Digital Graphics – Skills – Using a Graphics Package

Module 4: R082 – Creating Digital Graphics – Internal Assessment 

Module 5: R082 – Creating Digital Graphics – Internal Assessment 

Module 6: R084 – Storytelling with a Comic Strip – Skills – Using a Graphics Package

Implementation

The course outline is split across four units of study, two mandatory and two optional chosen by Wilmington Academy. Pupils will complete Unit R081 and R082  in year 1 (10) Key stage 4, and R084 and R089 in Year 2 (11). There will be an opportunity to re-sit any unit not meeting the expected standard. 

R081: Pre-production skills – (Mandatory) Written Paper Set by OCR

Students are introduced to a range of essential pre-production techniques used in the creative and digital media, including client brief, time frames, deadlines and preparation techniques

R082: Creating digital graphics – (Mandatory) Centre Assessed Assignment

Building on the skills and understanding that they have developed in the previous unit, students explore where and why digital graphics are used and the techniques that are involved in their creation. They apply their skills and knowledge in creating digital graphics against a specific brief.

R084: Storytelling with a comic strip – (Optional) Centre Assessed Assignment

Students explore different genres of comic strip and how they are created. They plan and create a comic strip to specific requirements, and review the final comic against a specific brief.

R089: Creating a digital video sequence – (Optional) Centre Assessed Assignment

Students discover where digital video sequences are used in the media industry and how these technologies are developed to reach an identified target audience as they plan, create and edit a digital video sequence and review it against a specific brief.

Impact

Creative iMedia will assess the application of creative media skills through their practical use. They will provide pupils with essential knowledge, transferable skills and tools to improve their learning in other subjects with the aims of enhancing their employability when they leave education, contributing to their personal development and future economic well-being. The qualifications will encourage independence, creativity and awareness of the digital media sector

https://wilmingtonacademy.org.uk/curriculum-and-assessment/assessment-recording-and-reporting/

Additional Resources:

MYP subject guide links – https://www.ibo.org/programmes/middle-years-programme/curriculum/design/

Learning Journeys/Knowledge Organiser Links

Knowledge Organiser Link

Distance Learning Links

Google Classroom Link to be assigned on sign up

Computer Science

DOL: Mr. Marriott (Email)

Subject Leader: Mr. Marriott (Email)

Intent

Computing plays a key part in the education of all children. Society demands a required use of technology, and therefore it is imperative it is taught well within Wilmington Academy. 

Students at Wilmington have the opportunity to apply and develop their technological understanding and skills to empower them to interact with technology and any issues outside of education. A rich computing curriculum equips students to use computational thinking and creativity to adapt to the ever changing digital society we live in. 

Students are taught how to use digital systems, how computers and devices work, programming fundamentals, data, hardware and software alongside the ethical issues raised within a digital society. 

Schedule of Learning:

Module 1: Boolean Logic – Units – Data – Algorithms

Module 2 : Programming Fundamentals – Practical programming

Module 3: Additional Programming Techniques

Module 4: Data Storage – Compression – Architecture of the CPU – Compression

Module 5:  Embedded Systems – Secondary Storage – Networks & Topologies – Primary Storage

Module 6: Wired & Wireless Networks – Networks Continued – Examination Techniques

Implementation

You will cover a content rich curriculum in a two year KS4 timescale. Following the new and updated J277 OCR Computer Science.

Component 01: Computer systems

Introduces students to the central processing unit (CPU), computer memory and storage, data representation, wired and wireless networks, network topologies, system security and system software. It also looks at ethical, legal, cultural and environmental concerns associated with computer science.

Component 02: Computational thinking, algorithms and programming

Students apply knowledge and understanding gained in component 01. They develop skills and understanding in computational thinking: algorithms, programming techniques, producing robust programs, computational logic and translators.

Component 03: Practical programming

Students are to be given the opportunity to undertake a programming task(s) during their course of study which allows them to develop their skills to design, write, test and refine programs using a high-level programming language. Students will be assessed on these skills during the written examinations, in particular component 02 (section B).

The course is 100% exam based in your final year within Key Stage 4, shown below;

Paper 1 – Computer Systems (50%) of your final mark)

Paper 2 – Computational thinking, algorithms and programming (50%) of your final mark

Programming Language (Python) will also be taught, but this will now be assessed within Paper 2 above. 

Impact

Computer Science aims to equip all students with the knowledge and understanding to take the content forward into a variety of courses and roles. Students can move seamlessly into college courses and onto University Degree courses. Pupils studying a course of Computer Science can also apply for niche apprenticeship placements within the subject area. Ultimately being digitally confident will stand our pupils in good stead in a rapidly changing ever evolving digital world.

https://wilmingtonacademy.org.uk/curriculum-and-assessment/assessment-recording-and-reporting/

Additional Resources:

Course Outline

LINK

Google Classroom Link to be assigned on sign up

Maths

DOL: Ms. Golemi (Email)

Intent

Maths curriculum at WA is designed to develop pupils’ ability to solve problems, to reason logically and to make sense of data. We encourage pupils to think, act and speak like true mathematicians. Our curriculum provides real stretch and challenge and opportunities for collaborative thinking, as well as space for independent thoughts and creative solutions. Pupils are explicitly taught strategies how to solve problems and are encouraged by teacher modelling to be able to express themselves in Mathematical language. We ensure the level of challenge is high enough for the most able, with scaffold and support available for pupils who need it. 

As a knowledge-based discipline, we believe that knowledge underpins and enables the application of skills. Therefore, our aim is to equip every pupil with the knowledge, skills and attitude for them to strive, succeed and exceed by developing fluency, reasoning and problem-solving skills. We achieve this by quality first teaching which ensures pupils understand underlying Mathematical principles and can apply them to a variety of routine and non-routine problems with increasing sophistication.  

We have high expectations of all of our pupils and expect that they leave as skilful mathematical learners and equipped with the skills needed for future learning.  

Schedule of Learning:

Foundation tier Higher tier

Module 1:Number and Geometry 1 Module 1:Number, Percentages and Statistic

Module 2: Percentages and Geometry 2 Module 2: Algebra 1 and Geometry 1

Module 3: Algebra 1 and Ratio and Proportion Module 3: Algebra 2, Ratio and Geometry 2

Module 4: Algebra 2 and Statistic 1 Module 4: Algebra 3 and Geometry 3

Module 5: Algebra 3 and Probability Module 5: Algebra 4 and Vectors

Module 6: Graphs and Transformations Module 6: Graphs

Implementation

Collaborative curriculum planning is at the heart of what we do in the faculty. We have designed a two-year KS4 scheme of learning that fully covers the National Curriculum. 

Alongside the schemes of learning, we have developed knowledge organisers for each year group which are enabling our pupils to master the key knowledge.

Our assessments are designed to promote better pupil learning and provide teachers with detailed information such as what topics they might need to teach again.

To support pupils’ progress we offer after school targeted revision sessions along with the UK Maths Challenge. 

Impact

Pupils have an opportunity to learn the curriculum methodically which is supported by carefully prepared lessons and resources. 

Our pupils’ knowledge and skills have increased swiftly which evidently has made their transition to the next step of their studies smoother and has given them a solid ground for making comprehensive future destinations.

Additional Resources:

www.mathsgenie.co.  

www.corbettmaths.com 

www.piximaths.co.uk 

www.maths4everyone.com

www.mathsbox.org.uk

senecalearning.com 

Modern Foreign Languages - Spanish

DOL: Lucía Fernández Secades (Email)

2iC: Alice Walker-Smith (Email)

Intent

The intent of the department curriculum is to ensure that all pupils are able to retain vital knowledge and master essential skills. Students are taught to build and develop their Spanish language skills, equipping them with the knowledge to communicate in a variety of contexts. We encourage our students to not only develop their linguistic knowledge, but also skills such as problem solving, memorisation techniques, empathy, lateral thinking, risk taking and creativity. The study of languages should also broaden their horizons and encourage them to step beyond familiar cultural boundaries and develop new ways of seeing the world. 

This course should enable students to:

  • develop their ability to communicate confidently and coherently with native speakers in speech and writing, conveying what they want to say with increasing accuracy
  • express and develop thoughts and ideas spontaneously and fluently
  • listen to and understand clearly articulated, standard speech at near normal speed
  • deepen their knowledge about how language works and enrich their vocabulary to increase their independent use and understanding of extended language in a range of contexts
  • acquire new knowledge, skills and ways of thinking through the ability to understand and respond to authentic spoken and written material, adapted and abridged, as appropriate, including literary texts
  • develop awareness and understanding of the culture and identity of the countries and communities where Spanish is spoken
  • make appropriate links to other areas of the curriculum to enable bilingual and deeper learning, where the language may become a medium for constructing and applying knowledge
  • develop language learning skills both for immediate use and prepare them for further language study in school, higher education or employment
  • develop language strategies, including repair strategies

Schedule of Learning:

Module 1: Holidays

Module 2 : School

Module 3: Technology

Module 4: Relationships

Module 5: Free Time

Module 6: Local area

Implementation

1. LISTENING

  • demonstrate general and specific understanding of different types of spoken language
  • follow and understand clear standard speech using familiar language across a range of specified contexts
  • identify the overall message, key points, details and opinions in a variety of short and longer spoken passages, involving some more complex language, recognising the relationship between past, present and future events
  • deduce meaning from a variety of short and longer spoken texts, involving some complex language and more abstract material, including short narratives and authentic material addressing a wide range of contemporary and cultural themes
  • recognise and respond to key information, important themes and ideas in more extended spoken text, including authentic sources, adapted and abridged, as appropriate, by being able to answer questions, extract information, evaluate and draw conclusions.

2. SPEAKING

  • communicate and interact effectively in speech for a variety of purposes across a range of specified contexts
  • take part in a short conversation, asking and answering questions, and exchanging opinions
  • convey information and narrate events coherently and confidently, using and adapting language for new purposes
  • speak spontaneously, responding to unexpected questions, points of view or situations, sustaining communication by using rephrasing or repair strategies, as appropriate
  • initiate and develop conversations and discussion, producing extended sequences of speech
  • make appropriate and accurate use of a variety of vocabulary and grammatical structures, including some more complex forms, with reference to past, present and future events
  • make creative and more complex use of the language, as appropriate, to express and justify their own thoughts and points of view
  • use accurate pronunciation and intonation to be understood by a native speaker.

3. READING

  • understand and respond to different types of written language
  • understand general and specific details within texts using high frequency familiar language across a range of contexts
  • identify the overall message, key points, details and opinions in a variety of short and longer written passages, involving some more complex language, recognising the relationship between past, present and future events
  • deduce meaning from a variety of short and longer written texts from a range of specified contexts, including authentic sources involving some complex language and unfamiliar material, as well as short narratives and authentic material addressing a wide range of relevant contemporary and cultural themes
  • recognise and respond to key information, important themes and ideas in more extended written text and authentic sources, including some extracts from relevant abridged or adapted literary texts
  • demonstrate understanding by being able to scan for particular information, organise and present relevant details, draw inferences in context and recognise implicit meaning where appropriate
  • translate a short passage from Spanish into English.

4. WRITING

  • communicate effectively in writing for a variety of purposes across a range of specified contexts
  • write short texts, using simple sentences and familiar language accurately to convey meaning and exchange information
  • produce clear and coherent text of extended length to present facts and express ideas and opinions appropriately for different purposes and in different settings
  • make accurate use of a variety of vocabulary and grammatical structures, including some more complex forms, to describe and narrate with reference to past, present and future events
  • manipulate the language, using and adapting a variety of structures and vocabulary with increasing accuracy and fluency for new purposes, including using appropriate style and register
  • make independent, creative and more complex use of the language, as appropriate, to note down key points, express and justify individual thoughts and points of view, in order to interest, inform or convince
  • translate sentences and short texts from English into Spanish to convey key messages accurately and to apply grammatical knowledge of language and structures in context.

Impact

Students will be supported with a number of different types of assessment materials to ensure they reach their full potential in their Spanish GCSE examination. 

Students will complete a full Foundation Spanish mock at the end of year 10. We use the following Assessment Objectives:

  • AO1: Listening – understand and respond to different types of spoken language (25%). This requires students to listen to recordings in Spanish and to answer questions on what they hear. Some of these questions will be multiple-choice and some will need the student to write short answers in English and Spanish.
  • AO2: Speaking – communicate and interact effectively in speech (25%). In this part of the exam students will do a short role play with the examiner and talk about a photo. They will also talk about two of the topics they have studied.
  • AO3: Reading – understand and respond to different types of written language (25%).The reading section will give the students passages to read and questions to answer. Some of these questions will be multiple-choice and some will need the students to write short answers in English and Spanish. Passages will be from Spanish/French sources such as emails, magazines and books. Students will also need to translate sentences or a short passage from Spanish into English.
  • AO4: Writing – communicate in writing (25%). In the foundation paper students will write about a photo, write a short passage and write a longer passage on one of a choice of two topics. In the higher paper students will write longer passages about two topics from a choice of four. At both levels there is also a translation exercise, from English into Spanish.

Exam Board Information

AQA GCSE (9-1) Spanish Specification

Additional Resources:

Year 10 Spanish Knowledge Organisers

Distance Learning Website

Thisislanguage

Seneca: Spanish

ActiveLearn

Music

Coordinator: Mr. Blackmore (Email)

Intent

At Key Stage 4, music is taught in mixed ability option groups. Students study the BTEC Level 2 Tech Award in Music Practice.

Students studying the BTEC will learn the features and techniques of a wide range of different genres and styles of music and how they are practically applied. They will learn how to perform and create music within these styles and how to use music theory to do this. They will also learn how to assess and develop their existing musical skills and how to put in place a plan for development.

The learning aims of course encompass the exploration of styles, techniques and genres, as well as personal and professional needed for further career development. They also focus on the application and development of practices as part of the skills process.

Each learning aim is broken down into specific grading criteria and together these learning aims reflect the knowledge, skills and attitudes that students need in order to perform, compose or evaluate music in a variety of styles and contexts.

Schedule of Learning:

Module 1-4: Component 1 – Exploring music styles and products

Module 5-6: Component 2 – Music skills development

Implementation

Students will be able to gain the necessary knowledge grounding whilst simultaneously applying this knowledge in practical workshops and the context of real world situations. They will have access to specific music resources including instruments and music software that will enable them to develop and hone their performance and composition skills.

Impact

BTEC Music aims to equip all students with the knowledge, understanding and skills to address further courses in Music, as well as specific workplaces that are related to the music industry. The vocational nature of this course equips them with necessary professional and personal skills that could be transferred to any workplace environment. Also, the focus on developing creative behaviours has wide ranging benefits to future careers and enables students to be innovators and reflective practitioners.

Students will be assessed under component learning aims.

For Component 1, these are:

Learning Aim A: Develop appreciation of styles and genres of music

Learning Aim B: Explore techniques used to create music products

For Component 2, these are:

Learning Aim A: Exploring professional and commercial skills for the music industry

Learning Aim B: Applying and developing individual musical skills and techniques

Each learning aim is broken down into grading criteria. The grading criteria for each learning aim describe a range of student performance from the lowest grade to the highest. From the lowest to the highest the grades go as follows:

Level 1 Pass

Level 1 Merit

Level 2 Pass

Level 2 Merit

Level 2 Distinction

The students will be summatively assessed every module from module 2-6 based on the current component or coursework being undertaken at that time. If you would like to look at the assessment recording and reporting cycle in more detail, please find the link below.

https://wilmingtonacademy.org.uk/curriculum-and-assessment/assessment-recording-and-reporting/

Exam Board Information

Additional Resources:

MYP subject guide links

MYP assessment criterion

Exam board links

Useful websites

Learning Journeys/Knowledge Organiser Links

Distance Learning Links

Core Physical & Health Education

DOL: Mr. Priest (Email)

Subject Leader: Ms. Collinson (Email)

Intent

At Key Stage 4, PE (PE) is taught in mixed gender, mixed ability sets. This is to allow all pupils the chance to work with a variety of pupils, in mixed environments and learning different skills. All pupils get the opportunity to to experience a broad range of sporting activities and will be challenged to achieve highly. At points, students will have a choice as to activities or ‘pathways’ they follow in order for them to start making decisions for themselves and the benefit maintaining their own healthy active lifestyles. 

PE aims to foster the development of knowledge, skills and attitudes in order to contribute toward students’ broad and balanced lifestyles. Through PE students can also learn communication, collaborative and self-management skills alongside this knowledge and skill acquisition in order to develop confident and positive pupils both in and out of sporting situations. 

Schedule of Learning:

Module 1 & 2: Developing Skills, Roles and Techniques / Fitness / Aesthetic Activities 

Module 3&4: Fitness / Tactics and Strategies / Aesthetic Activities 

Module 5 & 6: Tactics and Strategies  / Developing Skills, Roles and Techniques

Implementation

At Key Stage 4 pupils will experience themed modules encompassing a range of sports, opening doors to new activities. Each term, pupils will be able to choose pathways in activities within which they want to engage* 

Pupils are not assessed in their performance (as there is not accreditation as part of core PE) instead an attitude to learning and engagement score is given.

*COVID procedure currently stops this crossing of classes, instead instead of choices teachers work with individual groups to decide on activities and a range of activities within the class is still offered 

Impact

The impact of sustaining a healthy and active lifestyle is well documented yet many adults fail to participate in recommended activity levels. Through our curriculum we hope that students find not only an understanding of, but a passion for sport and exercise. Pupils enjoy PE and Health at Wilmington Academy and the curriculum is routinely adapted to reflect the global context at the time e.g. Olympics, World Cups. 

Through a theme based curriculum that encompass the holistic values pupils learn the value and enjoyment of health, fitness and wellbeing as well as making conscious decisions as to their own preferences and enjoyment.  We want pupils to become open-minded individuals, with a confidence not just in their abilities but in themselves

Assessment

There is no assessment in Core PE throughout KS4

BTEC Sport

DOL: Mr. Priest (Email)

Subject Leader: Ms. Collinson (Email)

Intent

At Key Stage 4 we want to further develop learners into rounded sports performers, and vice versa, utilising them with skills to take into future professions. Pupils can choose to study the Level 2 BTEC Tech Sport course where we aim to help learners acquire theoretical knowledge and technical skills through vocational contexts by exploring areas such as the body systems, psychology, nutrition, technology and leadership.

Learners will learn: 

  • Knowledge of the body systems, common sports injuries and technological advances that impact on sport and activity
  • Training, nutrition and psychological factors that influence and impact on engagement in sport and activity
  • The principles of leadership and the physical and psychological benefits for session participants. 

Those pupils who do not choose to study Sport will still be provided with practical PE lessons whereby they will experience a range of sports and exercise, with more emphasis on the choice and pathway the pupils want to take. Our objective is to allow students to find a exercise route within which they are confident and provide them with the tools to independently access and stay fit, healthy and active.

At all stages of PHE at Wilmington Academy we want our learners to develop, to try new activities and become socially, personally and morally confident. It is our intention to provide a broad, balanced and inclusive curriculum for all pupils to benefit from sport and exercise. 

Schedule of Learning:

Year 10: Component 1 – coursework based – Sporting injury, rehabilitation and technology 

Year 10: Component 2 – exam –  Principles of Training, Nutrition and Psychology for Sport and Activity

Year 11: Component 3 – coursework based – Leadership in Sport 

Year 11: Opportunities to continue Component 1 and Component 2 

Implementation

At Key Stage 4 pupils will experience themed modules encompassing a range of sports, opening doors to new activities. Each term, pupils will be able to choose pathways in activities within which they want to engage* 

Pupils are not assessed in their performance (as there is not accreditation as part of core PE) instead an attitude to learning and engagement score is given.

*COVID procedure currently stops this crossing of classes, instead instead of choices teachers work with individual groups to decide on activities and a range of activities within the class is still offered 

Impact

The impact of sustaining a healthy and active lifestyle is well documented yet many adults fail to participate in recommended activity levels. Through our curriculum we hope that students find not only an understanding of, but a passion for sport and exercise. Pupils enjoy PE and Health at Wilmington Academy and the curriculum is routinely adapted to reflect the global context at the time e.g. Olympics, World Cups. 

As a qualification we enjoy excellent results from students studying the BTEC Sport courses and many students go on to study Sport either here at Wilmington Academy or at College. Many students achieve equivalent of 4-9 grades in the BTEC course with most students achieving above their target grades, with plenty of Distinction / Distinction* level grades. PHE at Wilmington Academy offers an inclusive curriculum where pupils of all abilities are able to achieve. We are a deeply passionate department with shared values, aiming to provide high quality teaching and learning opportunities to all students. 

Assessment

The qualification gives learners the opportunity to build skills that show an aptitude for further learning, both in the sporting sector and more widely. BTEC assessment approaches help pupils to be successful in building skills and motivated to engage fully with challenging study. There is no limit to progression options as the skills acquired are applicable to a range of post-16 study options.

BTEC Tech Sport is broken down into 3 components

Component 1 – coursework based 

Component 2 – exam – At least a L1Pass is required

Component 3 – coursework based 

Students can achieve a level 1 pass, merit or distinction award or a level 2 pass, merit, distinction award. In all cases the component 2 exam must be passed. 

Relationships, Sex & Health Education

RSHE Lead: Miss. Hawkins (Email)

Intent

The Relationships, Sex and Health Education program is developed to help our students navigate our complex and changing world that we live in. The overall  aim is to develop healthy and happy students, who have developed knowledge and skills that will not only help them through their school years, but also during their adult life. Students will be educated about circumstances that they may face in the ‘real world’ as well as the ‘virtual world’ and explore methods of dealing with circumstances and emotions in a positive and protective way. Students, at the end of their education at Wilmington academy, will have the skills needed to help them develop resilience and begin to work out their place in the world. 

Schedule of Learning:

Action Day

Year 7

Day 1- In a world where you can be anything, be kind

Day 2- Our world

Day 3- 24 hours in A&E

Year 8 

Day 1- Fights, FOMO, friends and tattoos. 

Day 2- How can we create a healthy life?

Day 3- How can we create a happy life?

Year 9

Day 1- For better for worse, for richer, for poorer?

Day 2- Oh baby

Day 3- A snapchat story and beyond 

Year 10

Day 1- The not so nice side to relationships

Day 2- Physical health and fitness 

Day 3- It’s all fun and games? 

Form

Module Year 7-9 Year 10-11 
1 Mindfulness and mental health  Importance of mental health 
2 The dangers of alcohol and smoking Tackling extremism and radicalisation 
3 How can we be healthy? Links to personal hygiene and tooth decay How instagram and snapchat affect our mental health? What role have social platforms played in our lives? 
4 Celebrating diversity  Crime and law
5 Our impact on the world Where do your subjects take you?

How do subjects lead you to certain careers 

6 What is your identity? How is it created? Why is it important?  Careers

Implementation

Students are taught the 13 topics of RSHE through a spiralled curriculum, with knowledge built and developed as they progress throughout the school. Content is delivered during Action days and during form sessions on a weekly basis. The content, despite remaining similar, will change and be amended to suit the needs of the current cohort. 

Impact

Through lessons based on the 13 key elements of the framework, students will develop and build on knowledge gained, to help them develop the resilience, skills and knowledge that will help them to develop a healthy, happy and informed life.  Through the curriculum, students will be able to develop coping mechanisms to promote positive mental health, thus enhancing their experiences both socially and academically. 

Additional Resources:

RSHE- OFSTED framework

Policy

Science

Intent

Regardless of whether students are following the GCSE Combined Science or Separate Science GCSE pathway, the Science curriculum is designed to encourage students to think critically, reason logically and question the world around them. By undertaking experiments they design themselves, they collect and analyse data and justify their findings. The level of challenge is differentiated to meet all students’ needs. Scaffolding and support are always available for any student who needs it.

Year 10 Scheme of Learning

Module 1: Digestion, transportation in cells, DNA: mixtures, bonding, metals & non-metals: current, resistance, potential difference, atoms, isotopes
Module 2: Cell division, variation and evolution, classification: chemical analysis, structure and bonding of carbon: series and parallel circuits, Ohm’s law calculations, domestic uses & safety
Module 3: Genetics, evolution, photosynthesis: reactions of acids, quantitative chemistry: internal energy and energy transfer, atoms & nuclear radiation
Module 4: Animal tissue, organs and organ systems, reproduction: reactivity of metals, electrolysis: wave properties, wave speed calculations
Module 5: Photosynthesis & respiration: reaction of acids, pure & impure substances, quantitative chemistry: energy transfer, energy changes, specific heat capacity
Module 6: Variation and evolution, resistant bacteria: reversible reactions, organic chemistry: electromagnetic waves and magnetism & electromagnetism

Implementation

A fully digital and interleaved curriculum is at the heart of what we do in Science. This is not simply a 2-year scheme of learning, it is part of a 5-year plan that fully covers the National Curriculum. Trips and visits are undertaken to underpin knowledge and to offer students as insight to future career pathways. Many trips are cross-curricular to make students even more aware of how science is involved in many parts of everyday life and is enriched by an understanding of other academic disciplines.

Alongside the schemes of learning, we have developed knowledge organisers for each year group, these combined with low-stakes testing, enables our students to master keywords and concepts as well as keep the learning fresh in their minds.

Our assessments are designed to ascertain a student’s strengths and areas for development. Students are provided with personalised feedback and steps to ensure progression. They also provide teachers with detailed information with regard to knowledge gaps so that they can further support students’ learning by offering targeted revision sessions after school.

Impact

Students build on their KS3 knowledge and understanding and consequently are well-prepared for GCSE. Through studying carefully differentiated lessons and resources, and using our bespoke assessment and monitoring, our students’ skills and knowledge continue to increase. Our lessons are designed to link to a plethora of careers so students are given a solid base to make informed and comprehensive decisions about their future.

Art

Art Coordinator: Ms. Sampson (Email)

Intent

At Key Stage 4, art is taught in mixed ability option groups. Students study the BTEC Level 2 Tech Award in Art and Design Practice. 

Students studying the BTEC will learn the features and techniques of a wide range of material and techniques and how they are practically applied. They will learn how to generate ideas within art and design through their understanding of art movements and styles. They will also learn how to assess and develop their existing practical skills and how to put in place a plan for development and final outcome. 

The learning aims of the course encompass the investigation of art and design practice as well as the ability to generate and communicate art and design ideas. They also focus on the development of skills through application and review as well as the ability to record and communicate their skills development. 

Each learning aim is broken down into specific grading criteria and together these learning aims reflect the knowledge, skills and attitudes that students need in order to develop, create or evaluate artwork in a variety of styles and contexts.

Schedule of Learning:

Module 1-3: Component 2: Practical Skills in Art and Design 

Module 3-5: Component 3: Responding to a Client Brief   

Implementation

Students will be able to gain the necessary knowledge and understanding whilst applying this knowledge within their practical works though practical experimentation and reflection. They will have access to specific artwork resources including an A3 sketchbook, fine art materials and editing software that will enable them to develop their work further. 

Impact

BTEC Art and Design aims to equip all students with the knowledge, understanding and skills to address further courses in Art and Design, as well as specific workplaces that are related to the Art and Design industry. The structure of the course equips students with necessary professional and personal skills that could be transferred to any workplace environment. Also, the focus on developing creative behaviours has wide ranging benefits to future careers and enables students to be critical thinkers, innovators and reflective practitioners.

Students will be assessed under component learning aims.

For Component 2, these are:

Learning Aim A: Develop skills through application and review 

Learning Aim B: Record and communicate skills development

For Component 3, these are:

A01: Demonstrate understanding of client needs

A02: Develop and produce a response to a client brief

A03: Present a response to a client brief 

Each learning aim is broken down into grading criteria. The grading criteria for each learning aim describe a range of student performance from the lowest grade to the highest. From the lowest to the highest the grades go as follows:

Level 1 Pass

Level 1 Merit

Level 2 Pass

Level 2 Merit

Level 2 Distinction

Component 3 is externally assessed through A three part exam that consists of a three hour exam development paper, a practical exam and timed three hour exam for students to create and submit a digital portfolio of their practical work. Based on their response they will be given a grade listed above.

The students will be summatively assessed every module from module 2-6 based on the current component or coursework being undertaken at that time. If you would like to look at the assessment recording and reporting cycle in more detail, please find the link below.

https://wilmingtonacademy.org.uk/curriculum-and-assessment/assessment-recording-and-reporting/

Exam Board Information

Additional Resources:

MYP subject guide links

MYP assessment criterion

Exam board links

Useful websites

Learning Journeys/Knowledge Organiser Links

Distance Learning Links

Enterprise

DOL: Mr. M Hellyer (Email)

Subject Leader: Mr. M Hellyer (Email)

Intent

All businesses need enterprising employees to drive their organisations forward, to have ideas and initiatives to instigate growth, and to ensure that businesses survive in this fast-changing world. Enterprise is a key government focus and is set to form an important part of the UK’s global economic status, both now and in the future. Enterprise skills provide a fantastic progression pathway into a number of roles in an organisation and are transferable into all businesses.

Schedule of Learning:

Module 1: Component 1 – Exploring Enterprises 

Learning Aim A: Examine the characteristics of enterprises 

A1 What is an enterprise? 

A2 Types and characteristics of SMEs 

A3 The purpose of enterprises 

A4 Entrepreneurs 

Module 2: Component 1 – Exploring Enterprises 

Learning Aim B: Explore how market research helps enterprises to meet customer

needs and understand competitor behaviour

B1 Customer needs

B2 Using market research to understand customers 

B3 Understanding competitors 

Module 3: Component 1 – Exploring Enterprises 

Learning Aim C: Investigate the factors that contribute to the success of an enterprise

C1 Internal factors

C2 External factors 

C3 Situational analysis 

Module 4: Component 3 – Promotion and Finance for Enterprise

Learning Aim A: Promotion

A1 Elements of the promotional mix and their purposes

A2 Targeting and segmenting the market

A3 Factors influencing the choice of promotional methods

Learning Aim B: Financial records

B1 Financial documents 

B2 Payment methods 

B3 Sources of revenue and costs 

4 Terminology in financial statements

Module 5: Component 3 – Promotion and Finance for Enterprise

Learning Aim B: Financial records

B5 Statement of comprehensive income

B6 Statement of financial position 

B7 Profitability and liquidity  

Learning Aim C: Financial planning and forecasting

C1 Using cash flow data

C2 Financial forecasting 

C3 Suggesting improvements to cash flow problems 

C4 Break-even analysis and break-even point 

C5 Sources of business finance 

Implementation

What is an Enterprise? You will explore why enterprises are successful, looking at the impact of factors both inside and outside the control of the enterprise, and investigate ways in which situational analysis can be used to support decision making. You will discover how success can be monitored in a small or medium Enterprise (SME). This component will give you an understanding of the factors that contribute to a successful enterprise. 

You will also use the research to consider a number of ideas before developing a plan for a realistic micro-enterprise activity. You will have the opportunity to plan how best to set up the chosen enterprise and how to fund it. You will need to take responsibility for creating and then delivering a pitch for your developed idea to an audience using your knowledge of business, and demonstrating entrepreneurial characteristics, qualities and skills.

Finally you will assess and analyse financial information in an enterprise context to monitor the performance of an enterprise and strategies to improve its performance. You will investigate cash flow forecasts and statements, exploring the effects that positive and negative cash flow can have on an enterprise, and suggesting ways to improve them. You will consider the different elements of the promotional mix in order to be able to identify target markets and put forward strategies that enterprises can use to increase their success in the future.

Impact

This course provides you with the opportunity to develop sector-specific knowledge and skills in a practical learning environment. The main focus is on the knowledge, understanding and skills required to research, plan, pitch and review an enterprise idea that includes:

  • development of key skills that prove aptitude in planning an enterprise activity, including market research, planning, carrying out financial transactions, communication and problem solving 
  • knowledge that underpins effective use of skills, such as the features and characteristics of enterprises and entrepreneurs, and the internal and external factors that can affect the performance of an enterprise 
  • attitudes and ways of working that are considered most important for enterprise, including monitoring and reflecting on performance of an enterprise idea and own use of skills.

Assessment

Two internally assessed components of work (worth 30% each) , one externally assessed examination (component 3, worth 40%) There will be a second opportunity to sit the examination in year 11 if necessary. Internal assessment is externally moderated to ensure accuracy of marking. 

Students are graded for each component as Level 1 Pass, Level 1 Merit, Level 2 Pass, Level 2 Merit or Level 2 Distinction depending on the quality of coursework and marks achieved in the examination. Each grade is weighted in terms of points and the combined points from the three components determine their overall performance raging from Level 1 Pass upto and including a Distinction* (equivalent GCSE grade 7).

Exam Board Information

Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 Tech Award in Enterprise (Equivalent to 1 GCSE)

Further information is available at www.qualifications.pearson.com/en/home.html

Additional Resources:

Google Classroom

Course Specification

Knowledge Organisers

BTEC Tech Award Enterprise Student Book 2nd edition ISBN 978-1292279343

Revise BTEC Tech Award Enterprise Revision Guide ISBN 978-1

Travel & Tourism

DOL: Mr. M Hellyer (Email)

Subject Leader: Miss. S. Austin-Williams (Email)

Intent

The travel and tourism sector is the UK’s third-largest employer, accounting for 9.5% of total employment. Tourism is (current pandemic aside) one of the fastest-growing sectors in the UK in employment terms, employing nearly 3 million people, and the value of tourism to the UK economy is approximately £121 billion (7.1%) of UK GDP. Recent challenges have impacted on the industry and it will be interesting to witness the steps taken to recovery. Having the knowledge and expertise to respond to these challenges provides a unique opportunity for those in education and considering a career in the tourism industry.

Schedule of Learning:

Module 1: Component 3 – Customer Needs in Travel and Tourism

Learning aim B: Explore how to meet the needs and preferences of travel and tourism customers 

B1 Providing travel and tourism products and services to meet different customer needs and preferences

B2 Planning a holiday to meet customer needs and preferences

Module 2: Component 3 – Customer Needs in Travel and Tourism

Learning aim A: Investigate how organisations identify travel and tourism trends needs and understand competitor behaviour

A1 Types of market research 

A2 How travel and tourism organisations use research to identify customer needs 

A3 Travel and tourism customer trends 

A4 Customer needs, preferences and considerations 

Module 3: Component 2 – Influences on Global Travel and Tourism 

Learning Aim A: Factors that influence global travel and tourism 

A1 Factors influencing global travel and tourism

A2 Response to factors

Learning Aim B: Impact of travel and tourism and sustainability 

B1 Possible impacts of tourism

B2 Sustainability and managing social impacts

B3 Sustainability and managing economic impacts

B4 Sustainability and managing environmental impacts

Module 4: Component 2 – Influences on Global Travel and Tourism 

Learning Aim C: Destination management 

C1 Tourism development

C2 The role of local and national governments in destination management

C3 The importance of partnerships in destination management

Implementation

What is tourism? You will be given an opportunity to consider the role of different travel and tourism organisations, and how the features of the industry appeal to tourists in many destinations around the globe. 

This leads nicely into looking at the influences placed on global travel and tourism You will consider the factors that may influence travel and tourism and the ways that travel and tourism organisations, destinations and governments respond to these influences and their reasons. You will need to explore the possible impacts of tourism such as leakage, habitat loss and employment creation, and consider ways these can be managed by destinations, organisations and governments. How might tourism bring change to destinations over time and how destinations can encourage, manage and develop tourism. 

Keeping customers happy is fundamental to a successful tourism industry and therefore you will learn about the basic and specific travel and tourism needs of different types of customer and the factors that can influence their needs and preferences. You will need to look at and consider how travel and tourism organisations meet these needs and preferences by offering a variety of products and services, including different types of holiday and accommodation. Finally you will be expected to apply your understanding by selecting products and services and planning a holiday to meet the needs of specific customers.

Impact

The course will give you the opportunity to develop sector-specific knowledge and skills in a practical learning environment. You will develop: 

  • knowledge that underpins the effective use of skills, processes and attitudes in the sector such as the appeal of different tourist destinations to different types of customer, and the factors that influence travel and tourism 
  • skills such as researching different travel and tourism organisations, the features of tourist destinations, and the products and services available to meet the needs of different customers 
  • attitudes that are considered to be very important in the travel and tourism sector, including how to develop tourism while respecting the environment and local communities.

Assessment

Two internally assessed components of work (worth 30% each) , one externally assessed examination (component 2, worth 40%) There will be a second opportunity to sit the examination in year 11 if necessary. Internal assessment is externally moderated to ensure accuracy of marking. 

Students are graded for each component as Level 1 Pass, Level 1 Merit, Level 2 Pass, Level 2 Merit or Level 2 Distinction depending on the quality of coursework and marks achieved in the examination. Each grade is weighted in terms of points and the combined points from the three components determine their overall performance raging from Level 1 Pass upto and including a Distinction* (equivalent GCSE grade 7).

Exam Board Information

Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 Tech Award in Travel and Tourism (Equivalent to 1 GCSE)

Further information is available at www.qualifications.pearson.com/en/home.html

Additional Resources:

Google Classroom

Course Specification

Knowledge Organisers

BTEC Tech Award in Travel and Tourism Student Book ISBN 978-1292258690

Drama

Subject Leader: Miss. P. Wild (Email)

Intent

This course is for learners who want to acquire technical knowledge and technical skills through vocational contexts by studying acting, as part of their Key Stage 4 learning. The qualification recognises the value of learning skills, knowledge and vocational attributes to complement GCSEs. The qualification will broaden the learners experience and understanding of the varied progression options available to them. The Award gives learners the opportunity to develop sector-specific knowledge and skills in a practical learning environment. 

Assessment

For assessment, learners will be given a brief and stimulus to create a performance. Learners will capture their ideas on planning, development and effectiveness of the production process in a written log and an evaluation report which will be written under controlled conditions. 

Implementation

Component 3: Responding to a Brief

In this component, pupils will be given a brief that outlines the performance and design requirements and that asks students to consider their target audience and to start the creative process by using the given stimulus included in the brief. Working as part of a group, pupils will develop their ideas for a workshop performance and apply their skills and techniques to communicate their creative intentions to the audience.

Impact

This is evidenced through the encouraging exam results at BTEC 100% achievement for grades 4-9. (2020)

The impact is also evident in the future destinations of our students. Many of our students continue with their passion for Drama by studying Drama at further education.

Further information about the course is available here.

English

DoL: Ciara Cardiff
2iC: Lillian Drysdale

Curriculum Intent: 

We aim to nurture students’ personal development and linguistic competence through writing in a variety of forms for a range of purposes and audiences, and to increase their awareness of the writing process itself – from planning to proofreading and correction. A strong emphasis is placed upon linguistic and structural text conventions and upon the accuracy and presentation of written work. We also aim to promote the development of students’ evaluation and analysis skills to encourage critical thinking in order to study literature in depth and investigate authorial intent. Students are provided with the opportunity to explore different genres of texts from different time periods. Students will develop an understanding of context and be able to discuss the links between their studied texts and the context in which they were written. 

Schedule of Learning:

  • Module 1: English Language GCSE preparation 
  • Module 2: English Language GCSE preparation (English Language Mock)
  • Module 3: English Literature Revision – 19th Century text and Shakespearean text 
  • Module 4: English Literature Revision – Post-1914 text
  • Module 5: English Language and English Literature Revision 
  • Module 6: GCSE examinations

Implementation:

Reading comprehension and reading critically

  • Literal and inferential comprehension: understanding a word, phrase or sentence in context; exploring aspects of plot, characterisation, events and settings; distinguishing between what is stated explicitly and what is implied; explaining motivation, sequence of events, and the relationship between actions or events.
  • Critical reading: identifying the theme and distinguishing between themes; supporting a point of view by referring to evidence in the text; recognising the possibility of and evaluating different responses to a text; using understanding of writers’ social, historical and cultural contexts to inform evaluation; making an informed personal response that derives from analysis and evaluation of the text
  • Evaluation of a writer’s choice of vocabulary, grammatical and structural features: analysing and evaluating how language (including figurative language), structure, form and presentation contribute to quality and impact; using linguistic and literary terminology for such evaluation (such as, but not restricted to, phrase, metaphor, meter, irony and persona, synecdoche, pathetic fallacy)
  • Comparing texts: comparing and contrasting texts studied, referring where relevant to theme, characterisation, context (where known),
  • Style and literary quality; comparing two texts critically with respect to the above.

Writing

  • Producing clear and coherent text: writing effectively about literature for a range of purposes such as: to describe, explain, summarise, argue, analyse and evaluate; discussing and maintaining a point of view; selecting and emphasising key points; using relevant quotation  and using detailed textual references
  • Accurate Standard English: accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar. In addition, learners are required to study the following content:
    • at least one play by Shakespeare
    • at least one 19th century novel
  • A selection of poetry since 1789, including representative Romantic poetry
    • fiction or drama from the British Isles from 1914 onwards.

Impact:

Students will be supported with a number of different types of assessment materials to ensure they reach their full potential in their English Language and English Literature GCSE examinations.

  • GCSE English Language: 100% Examination  (Edexcel Exam Board)
  • Spoken Language Endorsement
  • GCSE Literature: 100% Examination (Edexcel Exam Board)
Geography

DOL: Miss. Hawkins (Email)

Intent

Our aim is to provide students with a curriculum that is engaging, but also develops students as world citizens.  As outlined by Michael Palin ‘So many of the world’s current issues – at a global scale and locally – boil down to geography, and need the geographers of the future to help us understand them’. It is therefore our aim, to not only develop students’ love for the subject, but also their ability to solve the world’s current issues. 

Students in Year 10 follow the AQA Geography specification, which enables students to develop knowledge of key human and physical geography, underpinned through local and global case studies and fieldwork. 

Student on this course and provided with fundamental skills and knowledge to help them succeed within Post 16 courses and beyond. 

Schedule of Learning as of 2021/22:

Students begin to study for both Paper 1 and Paper 2 of their GCSE. Within this year, students will focus on the following topics. 

Tectonic Hazards: Key processes at the plate boundaries, case studies of both rich and poor countries, focusing on the causes, effects and responses to earthquakes.

Weather Hazards: Students focus on developing knowledge on where tropical storms form. Case studies of both rich and poor countries are focused upon, exploring the causes, effects and responses to tropical storms.

Climate Change: Students develop knowledge on what is causing climate change, what the impacts are and how we can reduce the effects of climate change on both a personal level as well as on a large scale. 

Changing Urban Environments: Students explore the reasons why urban areas are growing. Students focus on Mumbai, a slum within India, the causes of growth, the effects of growth and also how it can be managed. Students also explore London, focusing on why it has grown, the impacts of this growth and how this can be managed sustainably. 

Changing Economic World: Students explore how countries are at different levels of development and why. Knowledge is gained on how countries are helped to ensure that they develop, exploring the positives and negatives of this. A large focus is also on the economy of the UK, how it has changed and the impact that this has had on the country.  

The Living World: Students explore tropical rainforests, with a focus on Malaysia. Students focus on the causes, effects and responses to deforestation. Within this topic, students also study a hot desert, focusing on their uses, the impacts of using deserts and also opportunities and challenges for development. 

Resource Management: Students explore how resources are distributed around the world, which is underpinned by the idea that it is not equal. Students then focus on food, exploring how some countries suffer from obesity, and how some suffer from malnutrition. A key focus is on how to ensure that everyone in the world has access to enough food. 

Rivers: Students develop an awareness of key processes that occur along rivers, working through each course of the river. Students also explore how these key processes can be managed.  Students explore the effects of these processes and management systems on people and the environment. Students are given opportunities to conduct fieldwork with the department, to see this topic in action. 

Coastal Landscapes: Students develop an awareness of key processes that take place at the coastline. Students also explore how these key processes can be managed.  Students explore the effects of these processes and management systems on people and the environment. Students will also work towards their Paper 3 exam during this topic, where they will complete fieldwork in Hastings.

The schedule of learning is subject to change due to students’ exam results. Content taught will be tailored to meet the needs of the students at the time. 

Implementation

GCSE Geography provides students with the opportunity to develop a breadth of Geographical knowledge, exploring both local and global case studies. Students focus on how the world we live in is affected by natural and human processes and the consequences of this. Students also develop knowledge on key geographical processes such as River and Coastal landscapes. A key focus is fieldwork, with students given the opportunity to undertake both human and physical fieldwork in contrasting locations. 

Impact

Assessment at GCSE is balanced between summative and formative assessment. Students are assessed at the end of each topic, given past exam papers to test knowledge, build their confidence and practice exam techniques taught in class. Students are assessed under the following Assessment objectives: 

AO1: Demonstrate knowledge of locations, places, processes, environments and different scales (15%). 

AO2: Demonstrate geographic understanding of: concepts and how they are used in relation to places, environments and processes; the interrelationships between places, environments and processes (25%)

AO3: Apply knowledge and understanding to interpret, analyse and evaluate geographical information and issues to make judgements (35%, including 10% applied to fieldwork context)

AO4: Select, adapt and use a variety of skills and techniques to investigate questions and issues and communicate findings (25%, including 5% used to respond to fieldwork data and context(s)

Students sit three exam papers at the end of Year 11:

Paper 1- Living with the Physical Environment – 1hr 30 minutes- 88 marks 

Paper 2- Challenges in the human environment – 1 hr 30 minutes – 88 marks 

Paper 3- Geographical Applications- 1hr 15 minutes- 76 marks 

Students will receive reports in Year 11 during Module 1,2,3,4 and 5, where attitude to learning, a current working grade and a predicted grade will be provided. Both current working grade and predicted grades will be based on end of topic tests and how well the students have performed in these. 

https://wilmingtonacademy.org.uk/curriculum-and-assessment/assessment-recording-and-reporting/

Exam Board Information

Specification

Additional Resources:

Knowledge organisers

Online Learning 

Health & Social Care

Coordinator: Ms. Vanhorne (Email)

Subject Leader: Ms. Vanhorne (Email)

Intent

The intent of the department curriculum is to ensure that all students acquire the skills, knowledge and interdependence required to work in this industry. Students are supported and encouraged to take responsibility for their own learning and develop skills that are essential for the modern-day workplace. Students are academically challenged through the broadness of the curriculum and a range of real-life scenarios which is aimed to prepare them for the future. We offer the BTEC Level 2 course at Key Stage 4, this course offers a clear assessment programme which gives students the opportunity to independently strive to achieve their full potential. The course gives students an insight into the skills and qualities required to work in a health and social care setting.

Schedule of Learning:

Module 1: Component 3 –  Health and Wellbeing 

Learning Aim B – Interpreting health indicators 

B1 Physiological indicators

B2 Lifestyle indicators

– Health indicators – Pulse rate, blood pressure, peak flow, BMI 

– Guidelines, abnormal readings 

– Alcohol and inactivity 

Module 2: Component 3 –  Health and Wellbeing 

Learning Aim C – Personcentred health and wellbeing improvement plans

C1 Health and wellbeing improvement plans

C2 Obstacles to implementing plans

– Person centred care, recommended actions

– Targets and support 

– Obstacles and barriers

Module 3: Component 3 –  Health and Wellbeing 

Revision for Learning Aims A,B and C 

Externally assessed examination (Learning Aims  A, B and C)

Module 4: Component 2 – Health and social care services and values

Learning Aim B: Demonstrate care values and review own practice

          B1  Care values 

                      B2  Reviewing own application of care values

– Care values, applying care values 

– Working together 

– Self-reflection 

– Responding to feedback 

Course work (LAB) – Summarise feedback and demonstrate the care values independently, making justified recommendations for improvements.

Module 5: Component 2 and 3 – Coursework and resit/retake revision

Standards verification for coursework for components 1 and 2 

Component 3: (Revision for Learning Aims A,B,C if applicable)

Implementation

At KS4, students develop an understanding of ‘human life span development’, and the importance of ‘health and social care values in the sector’. Students will develop vocabulary and knowledge through role-plays and case studies. All students will be registered to complete the Level 2 BTEC Tech Award in Health and Social Care which consist of three mandatory components. 

Impact

The impact of the BTEC Health and Social Care Curriculum can be measured in terms of the increase in the number of students progressing from Level 2 to 3. Engagement, progress attainment as evidenced through coursework and exam results. Raising aspirations through increased awareness and understanding of a range of Health and Social Care careers and entry routes. This subject also provides pathways into a wide variety of career options including nursing, teaching and education, social care, and provides access to numerous apprenticeships and study options within the NHS. 

Assessment

Two internally assessed components of work (worth 30% each) , one externally assessed examination (component 3, worth 40%) There will be a second opportunity to sit the examination in year 11 if necessary. Internal assessment is externally moderated to ensure accuracy of marking. 

Students are graded for each component as Level 1 Pass, Level 1 Merit, Level 2 Pass, Level 2 Merit or Level 2 Distinction depending on the quality of coursework and marks achieved in the examination. Each grade is weighted in terms of points and the combined points from the three components determine their overall performance raging from Level 1 Pass upto and including a Distinction* (equivalent GCSE grade 7).

Exam Board Information

Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 Tech Award in Health and Social Care (Equivalent to 1 GCSE)

Further information is available at www.qualifications.pearson.com/en/home.html

https://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/btec-tech-awards/health-and-social-care.html

Additional Resources:

Google Classroom

Course Specification

Online Learning 

Knowledge Organisers

BTEC Tech Award Health and Social Care Student Book ISBN 

Revise BTEC Tech Health and Social Care Revision Guide ISBN 

History

Individuals and Societies- History
History Coordinator: Miss Youdale

Intent

Our aim is to provide an engaging and inclusive History curriculum that allows all students to reach their full potential, develop a love of learning and understand how important history is to the world they live in today. As Marcus Garvey stated, “A person without knowledge of their past history, origin, and culture is like a tree without roots”. It is more important than ever to understand the events of the past, to engage in critical evaluation of sources and to make historical judgements.  Students gain the opportunity to travel through the past, learn why the world is the way it is today and become inquisitive, globally aware citizens. 

The History curriculum allows students to retain vital substantive knowledge, focus on second order concepts and master essential historical enquiry through source analysis, Interpretations and critical thinking. We want to equip our students with a curiosity of the world around them. The department focuses on a number of historical events and themes, from Migration over time, the rise of 20th century dictators across the globe, the British Empire as well as the key components of the National Curriculum such as what Britain was like before 1066, the Holocaust and a local study of dartford soldiers during WW1. 

Within the MYP, GCSE and IB curriculum, students are encouraged to reflect on the highs and lows of the past and use this to consider their role within society today. Our curriculum is constantly reviewed to ensure that it meets the National Curriculum, the needs of our current students and shapes them to be well rounded individuals that are knowledgeable and able to analyse and think independently about the world around them. 

Schedule of Learning as of 2021/22

  • Module 1: Paper 2 – Anglo-Saxon and Norman England, c.1060-88 (Anglo-Saxon England, 1060-66 and William I in power, 1066-87)
  • Module 2: Paper 2 – Anglo-Saxon and Norman England, c.1060-88 (Norman England, 1066-88, consolidation of knowledge and exam skills) 
  • Module 3: Paper 2 – Superpower Relations and The Cold War, 1941-91 (Cold War origins, 1941-58 and Cold War crises, 1958-70)
  • Module 4: Paper 2 – Superpower Relations and The Cold War, 1941-91 (Cold War nds, 1970-91, consolidation of knowledge and exam skills.)
  • Module 5: Revision and exam practice of all papers in preparation for summer exams. 

Implementation

For MYP History, our unit plans are based on ensuring full coverage of the National Curriculum through the use of the MYP and embedded IB philosophy. The department puts a great emphasis on KS3 as we give students the opportunity to research and investigate topics within History and be independent and conscientious with their approach to the work they produce. We have a student-led History Society that is centered around the topics that interest the students to ensure that they continue to develop a lifelong love of learning and experience learning in a different environment. 

Impact

The breadth and depth of the History curriculum will ensure that all students can be challenged in developing the disciplinary and substantive knowledge needed for them to be successful. This will ensure that they have the ability to access the next step in their education and in their lives. Skills include evaluating sources, weighing up evidence, determining the reliability of contemporary sources, debating and presenting both sides of an argument, analysing historical interpretations, student led enquiry and developing key literacy and numeracy skills, which are important not just for our subject but across multiple disciplines. This is evident in our excellent exam results at GCSE level, where our students achieved above national average, as well as IB grades in which 100% of students achieved a grade 5 or above. Students have gone on to pursue their passion for History at university level as well as other students being able to use their skills to gain apprenticeships in other sectors. 

We use the following Assessment Objectives

  • A01: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key features and characteristics of the periods studied. (35%)
  • A02: Explain and analyse historical events and periods studied using second-order historical concepts. (35%)
  • A03: Analyse, evaluate and use sources (contemporary to the period) to make substantiated judgements, in the context of historical events studied. (15%)
  • A04: Analyse, evaluate and make substantiated judgements about interpretations (including how and why interpretations may differ) in the context of historical events studied. (15%)

Students sit three exams on four units at the end of Year 11

  • Paper 1 – Medicine in Britain, c.1250-present  – 1 hour 15 minutes (30%) 52 marks
    Paper 2 – Superpower Relations and the Cold War, 1941-1991 and Anglo-Saxon and Norman England, c.1060-1088 – 1 hour 45 minutes (40%) 64 marks
    Paper 3 – Weimar and Nazi Germany, 1918-1939 1 hour 20 minutes (30%) 52 marks

Exam board information

Edexcel GCSE (9-1) History Specification

Additional resources

Year 11 History Knowledge Organisers

Distance Learning Website

BBC Bitesize GCSE Edexcel History – The Normans

Seneca Learning

 

ICT - Digital Design

DOL: Mr. Marriott (Email)

Subject Leader: Mr. Haciosman (Email)

Intent

Computing and ICT plays a key part in the education of all children. Society demands a required use of technology, and therefore it is imperative it is taught well within Wilmington Academy. 

Students at Wilmington have the opportunity to apply and develop their technological understanding and skills to empower them to interact with technology and any issues outside of education. A rich Digital Information Technology curriculum equips students to use computational thinking, creativity and practical skills to adapt to the ever changing digital society we live in. 

The digital sector is a major source of employment in the UK. Around 1.46 million people work in digital companies and there are around 45,000 digital jobs advertised at any one time. Digital skills span all industries, and almost all jobs in the UK today require employees to have a good level of digital literacy. The UK has positioned itself to be the ‘Digital capital of Europe’ as it continues to invest billions every year in digital skills and commerce. The modern world expects digital skills to be as important as English and Maths. Having both technical skills and business understanding is the key to success. (See Statement of Purpose for more details)

Schedule of Learning:

Module 1: Systems – Accessibility – Modern Technology – Interfaces

Module 2: 

Module 3: 

Module 4: 

Module 5: 

Module 6: 

Implementation

You will be assessed across three components as shown below. Two of these will be assessed on internally set and marked coursework (1 & 2), with the final component an externally set examination.

1 – Exploring User Interface Design Principles and Project Planning Techniques (Internal) 

2 – Collecting, Presenting and Interpreting Data (Internal) 

3 – Effective Digital Working Practices (External) 

In this qualification you will develop important technical skills in data interpretation, data presentation and data protection. You will cover aspects of user interface (UI) design and development, and learn how to develop a project plan for your own UI designs. 

Cybercrime is an increasing threat – understanding the different types of threats and how to mitigate them is vital to any business that uses and retains sensitive data. You will develop an understanding of what cyber security is and the importance of legal and ethical considerations when using modern technologies.

Organisations often implement technological improvements by rolling out change projects, so understanding how projects are structured is of vital importance. This qualification will enable you to use project-planning tools, models and techniques within a digital context. Digital projects today often involve working with diverse teams across different locations. 

You will develop an understanding of what a virtual work environment is and how cloud technologies allow remote teams to work together more effectively. 

Impact

You will have developed a broad range of practical skills used in digital functions. The digital aspects covered within this qualification are not covered in the GCSE in Computer Science. This qualification will give you a sense of the type of skills, knowledge and behaviours required in the modern digital sector. This will allow you to decide whether the digital sector is for you and, if so, where your strengths lie. 

This course builds on and uses the knowledge and skills from GCSE Maths and English, and complements learning in other GCSE programmes, such as GCSE Design and Technology, and Computer Science, which could be taken alongside this qualification to further develop your digital skills. There are also a number of design aspects within the user interface element of this qualification that complement BTECs in Art & Design and Creative Media & Digital Production.

https://wilmingtonacademy.org.uk/curriculum-and-assessment/assessment-recording-and-reporting/

Additional Resources:

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

LINK

SCHEMES OF WORK

EXPLORING USER INTERFACE DESIGN AND PLANNING TECHNIQUES

EFFECTIVE DIGITAL WORKING PRACTICES

TWO YEAR OULTINE

BLENDED LEARNING APPROACH

Google Classroom Link to be assigned on sign up

Creative iMedia

DOL: Mr. Marriott (Email)

Subject Leaders: Mr. Reffold (Email)

Intent

Computing and ICT plays a key part in the education of all children. Society demands a required use of technology, and therefore it is imperative it is taught well within Wilmington Academy. 

Students at Wilmington have the opportunity to apply and develop their technological understanding and skills to empower them to interact with technology and any issues outside of education. A rich Digital Information Technology curriculum equips students to use computational thinking, creativity and practical skills to adapt to the ever changing digital society we live in. 

Creative Media allows students to display a distinctive creative mindset, and create content within a digital environment. The Creative Media course looks at content within Games, Publishing, Audio Publications, Video and Film and Web 2.0. Students will gain a rich knowledge of the tools, techniques, demographic targeting and technical work that goes into creating a digital product

Schedule of Learning:

Module 1: R084 – Storytelling with a Comic Strip – Skills – Using a Graphics Package + Assessment

Module 2: R084 – Storytelling with a Comic Strip – Internal Assessment

Module 3: R089 – Creating Digital Video Sequence – Skills – Using a Editing Package

Module 4: R089 – Creating Digital Video Sequence –  Internal Assessment 

Module 5: R089 – Creating Digital Video Sequence –  Internal Assessment 

Module 6: 

Implementation

The course outline is split across four units of study, two mandatory and two optional chosen by Wilmington Academy. Pupils will complete Unit R081 and R082  in year 1 (10) Key stage 4, and R084 and R089 in Year 2 (11). There will be an opportunity to re-sit any unit not meeting the expected standard. 

R081: Pre-production skills – (Mandatory) Written Paper Set by OCR 

Students are introduced to a range of essential pre-production techniques used in the creative and digital media, including client brief, time frames, deadlines and preparation techniques

R082: Creating digital graphics – (Mandatory) Centre Assessed Assignment

Building on the skills and understanding that they have developed in the previous unit, students explore where and why digital graphics are used and the techniques that are involved in their creation. They apply their skills and knowledge in creating digital graphics against a specific brief.

R084: Storytelling with a comic strip – (Optional) Centre Assessed Assignment

Students explore different genres of comic strip and how they are created. They plan and create a comic strip to specific requirements, and review the final comic against a specific brief.

R089: Creating a digital video sequence – (Optional) Centre Assessed Assignment

Students discover where digital video sequences are used in the media industry and how these technologies are developed to reach an identified target audience as they plan, create and edit a digital video sequence and review it against a specific brief.

Impact

Creative iMedia will assess the application of creative media skills through their practical use. They will provide pupils with essential knowledge, transferable skills and tools to improve their learning in other subjects with the aims of enhancing their employability when they leave education, contributing to their personal development and future economic well-being. The qualifications will encourage independence, creativity and awareness of the digital media sector

https://wilmingtonacademy.org.uk/curriculum-and-assessment/assessment-recording-and-reporting/

Additional Resources:

COURSE OUTLINE

LINK TO WEBPAGE

SUPPORTING VIDEOS

LINK TO VIDEOS

REFERENCING 

DISTANCE LEARNING LINKS

Google Classroom Link to be assigned on sign up

Computer Science

DOL: Mr. Marriott (Email)

Subject Leader: Mr. Marriott (Email)

Intent

Computing plays a key part in the education of all children. Society demands a required use of technology, and therefore it is imperative it is taught well within Wilmington Academy. 

Students at Wilmington have the opportunity to apply and develop their technological understanding and skills to empower them to interact with technology and any issues outside of education. A rich computing curriculum equips students to use computational thinking and creativity to adapt to the ever changing digital society we live in. 

Students are taught how to use digital systems, how computers and devices work, programming fundamentals, data, hardware and software alongside the ethical issues raised within a digital society. 

Schedule of Learning:

Module 1: Threats to systems – Network Vulnerability – Utility Software – Operating Systems

Module 2 : Ethical, legal and Cultural Impact – Testing – Defensive Design

Module 3: Practical programming Skills – Searching and Sorting Algorithms 

Module 4: Theory & Revision – Practical Programming Skills

Module 5: Theory & Revision – Practical Programming Skills

Module 6: 

Implementation

You will cover a content rich curriculum in a two year KS4 timescale. Following the new and updated J277 OCR Computer Science.

Component 01: Computer systems

Introduces students to the central processing unit (CPU), computer memory and storage, data representation, wired and wireless networks, network topologies, system security and system software. It also looks at ethical, legal, cultural and environmental concerns associated with computer science.

Component 02: Computational thinking, algorithms and programming

Students apply knowledge and understanding gained in component 01. They develop skills and understanding in computational thinking: algorithms, programming techniques, producing robust programs, computational logic and translators.

Component 03: Practical programming

Students are to be given the opportunity to undertake a programming task(s) during their course of study which allows them to develop their skills to design, write, test and refine programs using a high-level programming language. Students will be assessed on these skills during the written examinations, in particular component 02 (section B).

The course is 100% exam based in your final year within Key Stage 4, shown below;

Paper 1 – Computer Systems (50%) of your final mark)

Paper 2 – Computational thinking, algorithms and programming (50%) of your final mark

Programming Language (Python) will also be taught, but this will now be assessed within Paper 2 above. 

Impact

Computer Science aims to equip all students with the knowledge and understanding to take the content forward into a variety of courses and roles. Students can move seamlessly into college courses and onto University Degree courses. Pupils studying a course of Computer Science can also apply for niche apprenticeship placements within the subject area. Ultimately being digitally confident will stand our pupils in good stead in a rapidly changing ever evolving digital world.

https://wilmingtonacademy.org.uk/curriculum-and-assessment/assessment-recording-and-reporting/

Additional Resources:

Course Outline

LINK

Google Classroom Link to be assigned on sign up

Maths

DOL: Ms. Golemi (Email)

Intent

Maths curriculum at WA is designed to develop pupils’ ability to solve problems, to reason logically and to make sense of data. We encourage pupils to think, act and speak like true mathematicians. Our curriculum provides real stretch and challenge and opportunities for collaborative thinking, as well as space for independent thoughts and creative solutions. Pupils are explicitly taught strategies how to solve problems and are encouraged by teacher modelling to be able to express themselves in Mathematical language. We ensure the level of challenge is high enough for the most able, with scaffold and support available for pupils who need it. 

As a knowledge-based discipline, we believe that knowledge underpins and enables the application of skills. Therefore, our aim is to equip every pupil with the knowledge, skills and attitude for them to strive, succeed and exceed by developing fluency, reasoning and problem-solving skills. We achieve this by quality first teaching which ensures pupils understand underlying Mathematical principles and can apply them to a variety of routine and non-routine problems with increasing sophistication.  

We have high expectations of all of our pupils and expect that they leave as skilful mathematical learners and equipped with the skills needed for future learning.  

Schedule of Learning:

Foundation tier Higher tier

Module 1:Number, Percentages, Algebra 1 Module 1:Number, Algebra 1

Module 2: Algebra 2, Ratio Module 2: Algebra 2 and Graphs

Module 3: Geometry 1 Module 3: Statistics and Probability

Module 4: Geometry 2 and Statistic 1 Module 4: Geometry 1

Module 5: Probability and Exam preparation Module 5: Geometry 2 and Exam preparation

Module 6: Exams Module 6: Exams

Implementation

Collaborative curriculum planning is at the heart of what we do in the faculty. We have designed a two-year KS4 scheme of learning that fully covers the National Curriculum. 

Alongside the schemes of learning, we have developed knowledge organisers for each year group which are enabling our pupils to master the key knowledge.

Our assessments are designed to promote better pupil learning and provide teachers with detailed information such as what topics they might need to teach again.

To support pupils’ progress we offer after school targeted revision sessions along with the UK Maths Challenge. 

Impact

Pupils have an opportunity to learn the curriculum methodically which is supported by carefully prepared lessons and resources. 

Our pupils’ knowledge and skills have increased swiftly which evidently has made their transition to the next step of their studies smoother and has given them a solid ground for making comprehensive future destinations.

Additional Resources:

www.mathsgenie.co.uk 

www.corbettmaths.com 

www.piximaths.co.uk 

www.maths4everyone.com

www.mathsbox.org.uk

senecalearning.com 

Modern Foreign Languages - French

DOL: Lucía Fernández Secades (Email)

2iC: Alice Walker-Smith (Email)

Intent

The intent of the department curriculum is to ensure that all pupils are able to retain vital knowledge and master essential skills. Students are taught to build and develop their French language skills, equipping them with the knowledge to communicate in a variety of contexts. We encourage our students to not only develop their linguistic knowledge, but also skills such as problem solving, memorisation techniques, empathy, lateral thinking, risk taking and creativity. The study of languages should also broaden their horizons and encourage them to step beyond familiar cultural boundaries and develop new ways of seeing the world. 

This course should enable students to:

  • develop their ability to communicate confidently and coherently with native speakers in speech and writing, conveying what they want to say with increasing accuracy
  • express and develop thoughts and ideas spontaneously and fluently
  • listen to and understand clearly articulated, standard speech at near normal speed
  • deepen their knowledge about how language works and enrich their vocabulary to increase their independent use and understanding of extended language in a range of contexts
  • acquire new knowledge, skills and ways of thinking through the ability to understand and respond to authentic spoken and written material, adapted and abridged, as appropriate, including literary texts
  • develop awareness and understanding of the culture and identity of the countries and communities where French is spoken
  • make appropriate links to other areas of the curriculum to enable bilingual and deeper learning, where the language may become a medium for constructing and applying knowledge
  • develop language learning skills both for immediate use and prepare them for further language study in school, higher education or employment
  • develop language strategies, including repair strategies

Schedule of Learning:

Module 1: Jobs and Future plans

Module 2 : French Festivals and customs

Module 3: Social issues 

Module 4: Environment

Module 5: Revision

Module 6: n/a

Implementation

1. LISTENING:

  • demonstrate general and specific understanding of different types of spoken language
  • follow and understand clear standard speech using familiar language across a range of specified contexts
  • identify the overall message, key points, details and opinions in a variety of short and longer spoken passages, involving some more complex language, recognising the relationship between past, present and future events
  • deduce meaning from a variety of short and longer spoken texts, involving some complex language and more abstract material, including short narratives and authentic material addressing a wide range of contemporary and cultural themes
  • recognise and respond to key information, important themes and ideas in more extended spoken text, including authentic sources, adapted and abridged, as appropriate, by being able to answer questions, extract information, evaluate and draw conclusions.

2. SPEAKING (No speaking examination in 2020-2021 due to Covid-19):

  • communicate and interact effectively in speech for a variety of purposes across a range of specified contexts
  • take part in a short conversation, asking and answering questions, and exchanging opinions
  • convey information and narrate events coherently and confidently, using and adapting language for new purposes
  • speak spontaneously, responding to unexpected questions, points of view or situations, sustaining communication by using rephrasing or repair strategies, as appropriate
  • initiate and develop conversations and discussion, producing extended sequences of speech
  • make appropriate and accurate use of a variety of vocabulary and grammatical structures, including some more complex forms, with reference to past, present and future events
  • make creative and more complex use of the language, as appropriate, to express and justify their own thoughts and points of view
  • use accurate pronunciation and intonation to be understood by a native speaker.

3. READING:

  • understand and respond to different types of written language
  • understand general and specific details within texts using high frequency familiar language across a range of contexts
  • identify the overall message, key points, details and opinions in a variety of short and longer written passages, involving some more complex language, recognising the relationship between past, present and future events
  • deduce meaning from a variety of short and longer written texts from a range of specified contexts, including authentic sources involving some complex language and unfamiliar material, as well as short narratives and authentic material addressing a wide range of relevant contemporary and cultural themes
  • recognise and respond to key information, important themes and ideas in more extended written text and authentic sources, including some extracts from relevant abridged or adapted literary texts
  • demonstrate understanding by being able to scan for particular information, organise and present relevant details, draw inferences in context and recognise implicit meaning where appropriate
  • translate a short passage from French into English.

4. WRITING:

  • communicate effectively in writing for a variety of purposes across a range of specified contexts
  • write short texts, using simple sentences and familiar language accurately to convey meaning and exchange information
  • produce clear and coherent text of extended length to present facts and express ideas and opinions appropriately for different purposes and in different settings
  • make accurate use of a variety of vocabulary and grammatical structures, including some more complex forms, to describe and narrate with reference to past, present and future events
  • manipulate the language, using and adapting a variety of structures and vocabulary with increasing accuracy and fluency for new purposes, including using appropriate style and register
  • make independent, creative and more complex use of the language, as appropriate, to note down key points, express and justify individual thoughts and points of view, in order to interest, inform or convince
  • translate sentences and short texts from English into French to convey key messages accurately and to apply grammatical knowledge of language and structures in context.

Impact

Students will be supported with a number of different types of assessment materials to ensure they reach their full potential in their French GCSE examination. 

Students will complete a full French mock in November/December and a second one in January/February. We use the following Assessment Objectives:

  • AO1: Listening – understand and respond to different types of spoken language (25%). This requires students to listen to recordings in French and to answer questions on what they hear. Some of these questions will be multiple-choice and some will need the student to write short answers in English and French.
  • AO2: Speaking – communicate and interact effectively in speech (25%). In this part of the exam students will do a short role play with the examiner and talk about a photo. They will also talk about two of the topics they have studied. No speaking examination in 2020-2021 due to Covid-19.
  • AO3: Reading – understand and respond to different types of written language (25%).The reading section will give the students passages to read and questions to answer. Some of these questions will be multiple-choice and some will need the students to write short answers in English and French. Passages will be from French sources such as emails, magazines and books. Students will also need to translate sentences or a short passage from French into English.
  • AO4: Writing – communicate in writing (25%). In the foundation paper students will write about a photo, write a short passage and write a longer passage. In the higher paper students will write longer passages about two topics. At both levels there is also a translation exercise, from English into French.

Students do either all Foundation tier or all Higher tier papers.

Exam Board Information

AQA GCSE (9-1) French Specification

Additional Resources:

Year 11 French Knowledge Organisers

Distance Learning Website

Thisislanguage

Seneca: French

ActiveLearn

Modern Foreign Languages - Spanish

DOL: Lucía Fernández Secades (Email)

2iC: Alice Walker-Smith (Email)

Intent

The intent of the department curriculum is to ensure that all pupils are able to retain vital knowledge and master essential skills. Students are taught to build and develop their Spanish language skills, equipping them with the knowledge to communicate in a variety of contexts. We encourage our students to not only develop their linguistic knowledge, but also skills such as problem solving, memorisation techniques, empathy, lateral thinking, risk taking and creativity. The study of languages should also broaden their horizons and encourage them to step beyond familiar cultural boundaries and develop new ways of seeing the world. 

This course should enable students to:

  • develop their ability to communicate confidently and coherently with native speakers in speech and writing, conveying what they want to say with increasing accuracy
  • express and develop thoughts and ideas spontaneously and fluently
  • listen to and understand clearly articulated, standard speech at near normal speed
  • deepen their knowledge about how language works and enrich their vocabulary to increase their independent use and understanding of extended language in a range of contexts
  • acquire new knowledge, skills and ways of thinking through the ability to understand and respond to authentic spoken and written material, adapted and abridged, as appropriate, including literary texts
  • develop awareness and understanding of the culture and identity of the countries and communities where Spanish is spoken
  • make appropriate links to other areas of the curriculum to enable bilingual and deeper learning, where the language may become a medium for constructing and applying knowledge
  • develop language learning skills both for immediate use and prepare them for further language study in school, higher education or employment
  • develop language strategies, including repair strategies

Schedule of Learning:

Module 1: Jobs and Future plans

Module 2 : Spanish Festivals and customs

Module 3: Social issues and Environment

Module 4: Healthy Leaving

Module 5: Revision

Module 6: n/a

Implementation

1. LISTENING:

  • demonstrate general and specific understanding of different types of spoken language
  • follow and understand clear standard speech using familiar language across a range of specified contexts
  • identify the overall message, key points, details and opinions in a variety of short and longer spoken passages, involving some more complex language, recognising the relationship between past, present and future events
  • deduce meaning from a variety of short and longer spoken texts, involving some complex language and more abstract material, including short narratives and authentic material addressing a wide range of contemporary and cultural themes
  • recognise and respond to key information, important themes and ideas in more extended spoken text, including authentic sources, adapted and abridged, as appropriate, by being able to answer questions, extract information, evaluate and draw conclusions.

2. SPEAKING (No speaking examination in 2020-2021 due to Covid-19):

  • communicate and interact effectively in speech for a variety of purposes across a range of specified contexts
  • take part in a short conversation, asking and answering questions, and exchanging opinions
  • convey information and narrate events coherently and confidently, using and adapting language for new purposes
  • speak spontaneously, responding to unexpected questions, points of view or situations, sustaining communication by using rephrasing or repair strategies, as appropriate
  • initiate and develop conversations and discussion, producing extended sequences of speech
  • make appropriate and accurate use of a variety of vocabulary and grammatical structures, including some more complex forms, with reference to past, present and future events
  • make creative and more complex use of the language, as appropriate, to express and justify their own thoughts and points of view
  • use accurate pronunciation and intonation to be understood by a native speaker.

3. READING:

  • understand and respond to different types of written language
  • understand general and specific details within texts using high frequency familiar language across a range of contexts
  • identify the overall message, key points, details and opinions in a variety of short and longer written passages, involving some more complex language, recognising the relationship between past, present and future events
  • deduce meaning from a variety of short and longer written texts from a range of specified contexts, including authentic sources involving some complex language and unfamiliar material, as well as short narratives and authentic material addressing a wide range of relevant contemporary and cultural themes
  • recognise and respond to key information, important themes and ideas in more extended written text and authentic sources, including some extracts from relevant abridged or adapted literary texts
  • demonstrate understanding by being able to scan for particular information, organise and present relevant details, draw inferences in context and recognise implicit meaning where appropriate
  • translate a short passage from Spanish into English.

4. WRITING:

  • communicate effectively in writing for a variety of purposes across a range of specified contexts
  • write short texts, using simple sentences and familiar language accurately to convey meaning and exchange information
  • produce clear and coherent text of extended length to present facts and express ideas and opinions appropriately for different purposes and in different settings
  • make accurate use of a variety of vocabulary and grammatical structures, including some more complex forms, to describe and narrate with reference to past, present and future events
  • manipulate the language, using and adapting a variety of structures and vocabulary with increasing accuracy and fluency for new purposes, including using appropriate style and register
  • make independent, creative and more complex use of the language, as appropriate, to note down key points, express and justify individual thoughts and points of view, in order to interest, inform or convince
  • translate sentences and short texts from English into Spanish to convey key messages accurately and to apply grammatical knowledge of language and structures in context.

Impact

Students will be supported with a number of different types of assessment materials to ensure they reach their full potential in their Spanish GCSE examination. 

Students will complete a full Spanish mock in November/December and a second one in January/February. We use the following Assessment Objectives:

  • AO1: Listening – understand and respond to different types of spoken language (25%). This requires students to listen to recordings in Spanish and to answer questions on what they hear. Some of these questions will be multiple-choice and some will need the student to write short answers in English and Spanish.
  • AO2: Speaking – communicate and interact effectively in speech (25%). In this part of the exam students will do a short role play with the examiner and talk about a photo. They will also talk about two of the topics they have studied. No speaking examination in 2020-2021 due to Covid-19.
  • AO3: Reading – understand and respond to different types of written language (25%).The reading section will give the students passages to read and questions to answer. Some of these questions will be multiple-choice and some will need the students to write short answers in English and Spanish. Passages will be from Spanish sources such as emails, magazines and books. Students will also need to translate sentences or a short passage from Spanish into English.
  • AO4: Writing – communicate in writing (25%). In the foundation paper students will write about a photo, write a short passage and write a longer passage. In the higher paper students will write longer passages about two topics. At both levels there is also a translation exercise, from English into Spanish.

Students do either all Foundation tier or all Higher tier papers.

Exam Board Information

AQA GCSE (9-1) Spanish Specification

Additional Resources:

Year 11 Spanish Knowledge Organisers

Distance Learning Website

Thisislanguage

Seneca: Spanish

ActiveLearn

Music

Coordinator: Mr. Blackmore (Email)

Intent

At Key Stage 4, music is taught in mixed ability option groups. Students study the BTEC Level 2 Tech Award in Music Practice.

Students studying the BTEC will learn the features and techniques of a wide range of different genres and styles of music and how they are practically applied. They will learn how to perform and create music within these styles and how to use music theory to do this. They will also learn how to assess and develop their existing musical skills and how to put in place a plan for development.

The learning aims of course encompass the exploration of styles, techniques and genres, as well as personal and professional needed for further career development. They also focus on the application and development of practices as part of the skills process.

Each learning aim is broken down into specific grading criteria and together these learning aims reflect the knowledge, skills and attitudes that students need in order to perform, compose or evaluate music in a variety of styles and contexts.

Schedule of Learning:

Module 1-2: Component 2 – Music skills development

Module 3-6: Component 3 – Responding to a Commercial Music Brief

Implementation

Students will be able to gain the necessary knowledge grounding whilst simultaneously applying this knowledge in practical workshops and the context of real world situations. They will have access to specific music resources including instruments and music software that will enable them to develop and hone their performance and composition skills.

Impact

BTEC Music aims to equip all students with the knowledge, understanding and skills to address further courses in Music, as well as specific workplaces that are related to the music industry. The vocational nature of this course equips them with necessary professional and personal skills that could be transferred to any workplace environment. Also, the focus on developing creative behaviours has wide ranging benefits to future careers and enables students to be innovators and reflective practitioners.

Students will be assessed under component learning aims.

For Component 2, these are:

Learning Aim A: Exploring professional and commercial skills for the music industry

Learning Aim B: Applying and developing individual musical skills and techniques

For Component 3, these are:

AO1: Understand how to respond to a commercial brief

AO2: Select and apply musical skills in response to a commercial brief.

AO3: Present a final music product in response to a commercial brief.

AO4: Comment on the creative process and outcome in response to a commercial brief.

Each learning aim is broken down into grading criteria. The grading criteria for each learning aim describe a range of student performance from the lowest grade to the highest. From the lowest to the highest the grades go as follows:

Level 1 Pass

Level 1 Merit

Level 2 Pass

Level 2 Merit

Level 2 Distinction

Component 3 is externally assessed through A three-hour exam based on a brief given by the exam board. Based on their response they will be given a grade listed above.

The students will be summatively assessed every module based on the current component or coursework being undertaken at that time. If you would like to look at the assessment recording and reporting cycle in more detail, please find the link below.

https://wilmingtonacademy.org.uk/curriculum-and-assessment/assessment-recording-and-reporting/

Exam Board Information

Additional Resources:

MYP subject guide links

MYP assessment criterion

Exam board links

Useful websites

Learning Journeys/Knowledge Organiser Links

Distance Learning Links

Core Physical & Health Education

DOL: Mr. Priest (Email)

Subject Leader: Ms. Collinson (Email)

Intent

At Key Stage 4, PE (PE) is taught in mixed gender, mixed ability sets. This is to allow all pupils the chance to work with a variety of pupils, in mixed environments and learning different skills. All pupils get the opportunity to to experience a broad range of sporting activities and will be challenged to achieve highly. At points, students will have a choice as to activities or ‘pathways’ they follow in order for them to start making decisions for themselves and the benefit maintaining their own healthy active lifestyles. 

PE aims to foster the development of knowledge, skills and attitudes in order to contribute toward students’ broad and balanced lifestyles. Through PE students can also learn communication, collaborative and self-management skills alongside this knowledge and skill acquisition in order to develop confident and positive pupils both in and out of sporting situations. 

Schedule of Learning:

Module 1 & 2: Developing Skills, Roles and Techniques / Fitness / Aesthetic Activities 

Module 3&4: Fitness / Tactics and Strategies / Aesthetic Activities 

Module 5 & 6: Tactics and Strategies  / Developing Skills, Roles and Techniques

Implementation

At Key Stage 4 pupils will experience themed modules encompassing a range of sports, opening doors to new activities. Each term, pupils will be able to choose pathways in activities within which they want to engage* 

Pupils are not assessed in their performance (as there is not accreditation as part of core PE) instead an attitude to learning and engagement score is given.

*COVID procedure currently stops this crossing of classes, instead instead of choices teachers work with individual groups to decide on activities and a range of activities within the class is still offered 

Impact

The impact of sustaining a healthy and active lifestyle is well documented yet many adults fail to participate in recommended activity levels. Through our curriculum we hope that students find not only an understanding of, but a passion for sport and exercise. Pupils enjoy PE and Health at Wilmington Academy and the curriculum is routinely adapted to reflect the global context at the time e.g. Olympics, World Cups. 

Through a theme based curriculum that encompass the holistic values pupils learn the value and enjoyment of health, fitness and wellbeing as well as making conscious decisions as to their own preferences and enjoyment.  We want pupils to become open-minded individuals, with a confidence not just in their abilities but in themselves

Assessment

There is no assessment in Core PE throughout KS4

BTEC Sport

DOL: Mr. Priest (Email)

Subject Leader: Ms. Collinson (Email)

Intent

At Key Stage 4 we want to further develop learners into rounded sports performers, and vice versa, utilising them with skills to take into future professions. Pupils can choose to study the Level 2 BTEC Tech Sport course where we aim to help learners acquire theoretical knowledge and technical skills through vocational contexts by exploring areas such as the body systems, psychology, nutrition, technology and leadership.

Learners will learn: 

  • Knowledge of the body systems, common sports injuries and technological advances that impact on sport and activity
  • Training, nutrition and psychological factors that influence and impact on engagement in sport and activity
  • The principles of leadership and the physical and psychological benefits for session participants. 

Those pupils who do not choose to study Sport will still be provided with practical PE lessons whereby they will experience a range of sports and exercise, with more emphasis on the choice and pathway the pupils want to take. Our objective is to allow students to find a exercise route within which they are confident and provide them with the tools to independently access and stay fit, healthy and active.

At all stages of PHE at Wilmington Academy we want our learners to develop, to try new activities and become socially, personally and morally confident. It is our intention to provide a broad, balanced and inclusive curriculum for all pupils to benefit from sport and exercise. 

Schedule of Learning:

Year 10: Component 1 – coursework based – Sporting injury, rehabilitation and technology 

Year 10: Component 2 – exam –  Principles of Training, Nutrition and Psychology for Sport and Activity

Year 11: Component 3 – coursework based – Leadership in Sport 

Year 11: Opportunities to continue Component 1 and Component 2 

Implementation

At Key Stage 4 pupils will experience themed modules encompassing a range of sports, opening doors to new activities. Each term, pupils will be able to choose pathways in activities within which they want to engage* 

Pupils are not assessed in their performance (as there is not accreditation as part of core PE) instead an attitude to learning and engagement score is given.

*COVID procedure currently stops this crossing of classes, instead instead of choices teachers work with individual groups to decide on activities and a range of activities within the class is still offered 

Impact

The impact of sustaining a healthy and active lifestyle is well documented yet many adults fail to participate in recommended activity levels. Through our curriculum we hope that students find not only an understanding of, but a passion for sport and exercise. Pupils enjoy PE and Health at Wilmington Academy and the curriculum is routinely adapted to reflect the global context at the time e.g. Olympics, World Cups. 

As a qualification we enjoy excellent results from students studying the BTEC Sport courses and many students go on to study Sport either here at Wilmington Academy or at College. Many students achieve equivalent of 4-9 grades in the BTEC course with most students achieving above their target grades, with plenty of Distinction / Distinction* level grades. PHE at Wilmington Academy offers an inclusive curriculum where pupils of all abilities are able to achieve. We are a deeply passionate department with shared values, aiming to provide high quality teaching and learning opportunities to all students. 

Assessment

The qualification gives learners the opportunity to build skills that show an aptitude for further learning, both in the sporting sector and more widely. BTEC assessment approaches help pupils to be successful in building skills and motivated to engage fully with challenging study. There is no limit to progression options as the skills acquired are applicable to a range of post-16 study options.

BTEC Tech Sport is broken down into 3 components:

Component 1 – coursework based 

Component 2 – exam – At least a L1Pass is required

Component 3 – coursework based 

Students can achieve a level 1 pass, merit or distinction award or a level 2 pass, merit, distinction award. In all cases the component 2 exam must be passed. 

Science

Intent

Regardless of whether students are following the Combined Science or Separate Science GCSE pathway, the Science curriculum is designed to encourage students to think critically, reason logically and question the world around them. By undertaking experiments they design themselves, they collect and analyse data and justify their findings. The level of challenge is differentiated to meet all students’ needs. Scaffolding and support are always available for any student who needs it.

Year 11 Science GCSE Scheme of Learning

Module 1: Homeostasis & response, central nervous system, hormonal control in humans, menstrual cycle: rates of reaction, equilibrium; forces, reaction time, braking and stopping distances, momentum, waves, electromagnetic waves & magnetism
Module 2: Carbon, nitrogen & water cycles, biodiversity, ecosystems: energy changes, greenhouse gases, pollution & sources, recycling, LCA, using Earth’s resources: resultant forces, free body diagrams, distance-time graphs, velocity-time graphs
Module 3-5: Revision & exam practise
Module 5-6: GCSE examinations

Implementation

Year 10 End of year examinations are reviewed for knowledge gaps and these are filled once we have finished teaching the syllabus in module 2. Students are set 2 mock examination windows, one in November-December whereby they are tested on all 3 Paper 1 materials in Biology, Chemistry & Physics (half the syllabus) and then again in March-April when for Science, all students sit all 6 exam papers.

From Module 3 onwards, we review knowledge gaps and work on improving our exam skills by doing walking, talking mocks and loads of exam practise questions. We continue to also complete low-stakes testing for knowledge and understanding. We revisit the required practical assessments (RPAs) which students will have to answer questions on in their exams and we spend considerable time improving our maths skills. This is because 40% of the exam questions are fact-based; 40% are maths-based and 20% are practically-based.

Students are continually provided with personalised feedback and steps to ensure progression. After-school revision and targeted intervention sessions are put in place for students who need/want additional help.

Impact

Students build on their KS3 knowledge and understanding through our 5-year programme and as a result are well-prepared for GCSE. Through studying carefully differentiated lessons and resources, and using our bespoke assessment monitoring, our students skills and knowledge continue to increase. Our lessons are designed to link to a plethora of careers so students are given a solid base to make well-informed decisions about their future.