Pupil Premium Grant 2021-22

This page outlines the pupil premium funding for the academic year 2021-22. The total budgeted for this year is £175,858.

School overview

School name

Wilmington Academy

Number of pupils in school

1351

Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils

252 (19%)

Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers (3 year plans are recommended)

2021-2024

Date this statement was published

October 2021

Date on which it will be reviewed

October 2022

Statement authorised by

MGO

Pupil premium lead

CQU

Governor / Trustee lead

DLI

Funding Overview

Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year

£145,318

Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year

£30,540

Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable)

£0

Total budget for this academic year

£175,858

Statement of intent

Quality of education
To enhance ‘The Wilmington Way’ so that it contains UDL strategies to ensure more effective use of appropriate pedagogies, for example:
questioning, collaborative learning and independent learning.

To ensure robust SEND/Wellbeing support is available for students with SEMH (Social, emotional and mental health) issues and Specific
Learning Difficulties in particular year 8 and continued clear support strategies for disadvantaged students.

Behaviour and attitudes
To continue to improve attendance figures for disadvantaged pupils and reduce persistent absence of Disadvantaged students.

Leadership and management
To close the gap between DA and ‘Other’ student attainment at Wilmington Academy across all key stages.

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils

Academic Challenges

Challenge 1

The literacy skills of DA pupils are much lower compared to their non-DA peers, preventing DA pupils from making progress.

Challenge 2

DA pupils (including DHAPs) make less progress compared to their non-DA peers in most subjects and this includes English and maths.

Challenge 3

Low aspirations and self-esteem. To raise the aspirations of DA pupils, they need to experience a wide range of enrichment opportunities to broaden their horizons. This includes trips and visits.

External Challenges

Challenge 4

Attendance of DA pupils is much lower compared to their non-DA peers. As a result there is a loss of learning, which has a negative impact on their levels of progress.

Challenge 5

Many DA students do not have access to the materials needed to support their learning. This may include: IT/internet access at home, revision books and basic equipment.

Challenge 6

Some DA pupils have social, emotional and mental health needs that have a negative impact on their well-being and academic progress.  They also face difficult challenges in their lives due to lack of stability, role models and access to necessities.

Challenge 7

Parental engagement has always been a challenge, especially attendance to parents’ evenings. Parents of DA pupils can have a positive impact on their child’s progress if support and workshops are provided.

Intended Outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome

Success criteria

To improve student attainment for disadvantaged students through
high quality teaching and learning.

  • The quality assurance of lessons will show effective teaching and learning with evidence of highly effective teaching over time. This will be monitored through
    observations, learning walks, Record of Progress folders and student voice.
  • The attainment gap diminishes between DA and others.  The 2022 attainment score will show an improvement from 2021 and inline with national average (non-selective schools in Kent).
  • Higher expectations of DA students will show that DA students are making equivalent or better progress compared to their non-DA peers and have improved ATL scores over time.

To effectively use data tracking points to identify disadvantaged
students for interventions.

Effective data analysis will result in interventions being allocated to DA students that need it the most. The quality assurance and tracking of interventions will show progress of DA students.

To improve the literacy, oracy and reading scores of disadvantaged students so that the gap diminishes between DA and their non-DA
peers.

  • Years 7 and 8 DA students will show improved reading scores. The gap diminishes between DA and their non-DA peers.
  • Observations, learning walks and students’ work illustrate that all teachers consistently model and promote high standards of literacy.
  • There is a consistent approach to the teaching and marking of literacy across the curriculum.

To increase the number of disadvantaged students accessing extracurricular activities, trips and experiences.

  • Enrichment activities will develop cultural capital within students and increase well-being.
  • Opportunities for DA students to visit higher education establishments will increase the number of students at KS5 and numbers attending university.

To reduce attendance gap for DA students.

  • Improved attendance of DA pupils across all year groups.
  • Persistent absence is in line with non-DA peers.

To improve resilience and engagement of DA students.

Behaviour log shows a reduction in the number of behaviour incidents for DA students and an increase in the number of merits.

To increase parental engagement.

  • Increase in parental satisfaction in parents’ evening survey.
  • Increase in parental attendance to parents’ evenings across all year groups.

To improve metacognitive, self-regulatory and study skills of
disadvantaged students.

  • Observations and learning walks show that all teachers are effectively modelling metacognitive and self-regulatory strategies.
  • Improved rates of independent learning.
  • Reduction in the attainment gap between DA and their non-DA peers.

Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Budgeted cost: £55,000

Activity 1

To improve student attainment for disadvantaged students through high quality teaching and learning.  To effectively use data tracking points to identify disadvantaged students for interventions. To improve metacognitive, self-regulatory and study skills of disadvantaged students.

More information

  • To continue to improve the consistency of Quality First Teaching and to implement UDL strategies to ensure that all students are provided with appropriate challenge to enable them to think more deeply and accelerate progress.
  • Through quality assurance processes, lessons need to be accessible so that students are challenged and supported in their learning.
  • To develop the pedagogy of Blended Learning with the use of Google Classroom and Knowledge Organisers (set as Home Learning) to provide the highest quality first teaching and learning opportunities for all students.
  • To ensure teachers acquire the professional understanding and skills to develop pupils’ metacognitive knowledge and explicitly teach pupils
    metacognitive strategies in ‘learning to learn’ or ‘thinking skills’.
  • Ensure high quality feedback through effective teacher/student dialogue so that all students make accelerated progress.
  • Staff to use seating plans effectively and ensure DA students are highlighted.
  • Ensure all faculties have in place quality assessments that result in accurate data tracking and provide information regarding gaps in
    knowledge for DA pupils.
  • DA are prioritised for revision sessions and intervention targets underperforming DA students.
  • To carry out Year 7 students baseline testing to identify students that require additional targeted support in a timely manner.
  • Deploy highly effective tutors to catch up DA students due to lost curriculum time.

Evidence that supports this approach

Leaders from schools that have raised the attainment of disadvantaged pupils (as shown in their academic performance data) have emphasised the importance of Quality First Teaching.

Research from John Hattie’s Visible Learning and the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) shows that high quality teaching and learning can make a whole year’s difference. Recent evidence from the Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) shows that it is important to develop effective use of pedagogies such as collaborative learning. Through collaboration, pupils may develop explanation, demonstration, problem-solving and metacognitive skills which have a positive impact in raising their attainment.

To consolidate and extend pupils’ learning at home, the Academy has implemented the Blended Learning approach which aims to develop independence, resilience and self-regulatory skills.  Studies carried out by the EEF show that digital technology is associated with moderate learning
gains if used effectively as a supplement to teaching and learning. The use of Knowledge Organisers (set as Home Learning) is essential for retrieval practice, explicit teaching of vocabulary instruction and metacognitive learning. The EEF shows that Home Learning has a positive impact on raising attainment (on average +5 months) particularly with pupils in secondary
schools.

Evidence suggests that the use of ‘metacognitive strategies’ which gets students to think about their own learning is an effective way to improve pupil outcomes. The EEF toolkit has shown that metacognition and self-regulation have an impact of +7 months to progress when used well.

Providing feedback is well-evidenced and has a high impact on learning outcomes (+6 months as highlighted in the EEF). Feedback is most effective/has the greatest impact when coupled with metacognitive and self-regulatory approaches.

A classroom to support teaching and learning. The classroom seating arrangements have an effect on student participation as outlined by Professor Robert Sommer ‘The teacher’s educational philosophy will be reflected in the layout of the classroom. The teacher should be able to justify the arrangement of desks and chairs on the basis of certain educational goals.  There is no ideal classroom layout for all activities’. (Sommer, 1977).

Effective data analysis and targeted intervention can promote progress (National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER)).

To ensure high attainment and progress, extra support will be required. Small group intervention with highly qualified staff is most effective. The interventions will be targeted to ensure gaps in learning have been closed and that DA students are prioritised. The baseline testing of Year 7 will identify gaps in knowledge (as a result of the pandemic) and inform future teaching and planning of appropriate interventions. Intervention for students may include literacy and numeracy catch up, holiday sessions and sessions delivered by external agencies such as the National Tutoring Programme. EEF toolkit has shown that small group tuition can greatly accelerate the progress of
disadvantaged students. Other support may take the form of additional resources such as revision guides, workbooks, reading books and access to the Chromebook Scheme.

Challenge number(s) addressed

2 and 5

Activity 2

To improve the literacy, oracy and reading scores of disadvantaged students so that the gap diminishes between DA and their non-DA peers.

More information

  • To embed whole-school literacy initiative (Keys to Success) with particular focus on key vocabulary (‘Word-Rich Classrooms’).
  • To STAR test students in Years 7 -9 and track progress each term.
  • MYON and AR – To regularly monitor the data through the online reporting system.
  • Developing staff in their delivery of Oracy in the classroom.
  • To build on our success with ‘Marking for Literacy’ and ensure that it is highlighted more effectively in all R.o.P. folders.
  • To implement Bedrock Learning (research-based curriculum that teaches students the language they need to succeed at school).
  • To implement a Year 6 Transition Summer Programme.

Evidence that supports this approach

Accelerated Reader has shown to have a positive impact on both national and school data.

Research shows that there is a direct correlation between a pupil’s vocabulary size and their academic progress. Bedrock Learning is an online literacy and English curriculum which utilises adaptive technology to improve literacy outcomes. Research from the EEF suggests that students benefit from a broad and balanced range of literacy approaches. A vocabulary rich learning environment will accelerate progress with all students including DA.

Improved oracy leads to improved written responses and progress (+6 months EEF). Some studies have reported an improved classroom climate and fewer behavioural issues following work on oracy. Research shows that DA students typically have weaker oracy skills therefore, this needs to be a key priority to drive progress for DA students.

Research from the EEF shows that students that attend summer school make additional progress with the greatest impact seen when the programme is extensive, well-resourced and involves small groups or one to one teaching by trained and experienced teachers.

Challenge number(s) addressed

1 and 2

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £105,858

Activity 1

To focus on developing resilience in pupils by creating a positive classroom culture so that students feel confident in undertaking challenging tasks/facing obstacles and are better equipped to learn from failure and adapt to change.

More information

  • To ensure robust well-being support/behaviour interventions are available to students to help them manage their self-regulation, social or emotional
    skills.
  • To ensure all staff implement the new behaviour policy and procedures consistently.

Evidence that supports this approach

It is essential that resilience is developed in pupils so that they can be successful and be the best version of themselves as highlighted in the EEF – Improving Behaviour in Schools.

Due to the pandemic, we have seen an increase in the number of students requiring support over the last academic year. Staff are also more aware of some of the main challenges facing students which might impact on their academic progress. Therefore, it is important for students to develop greater emotional resilience which will support them in school. Students will have access to well-being and pastoral support and external agencies.

Research from the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) shows that successful schools have effective behaviour strategies but some pupils need extra support to develop positive attitudes to learning and resilience when the lesson is challenging. The EEF toolkit suggests that targeted interventions matched to specific students with particular needs can be very effective at promoting well-being and improving attainment. (https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/news/new-eef-report-6-recommendations-for-improving-behaviour-in-schools).

Challenge number(s) addressed

6

Activity 2

To increase the number of disadvantaged students accessing extracurricular activities, trips and experiences.

More information

  • To ensure DA students have the same opportunities as their non-DA peers have so they can experience the same activities and take part in life changing experiences.
  • To ensure DA pupils are making informed choices about their futures through use of My Career Options.
  • To implement a Post 16 Mentoring Programme to ensure DA students have the life skills and the strategies to succeed academically at school and
    beyond.

Evidence that supports this approach

Research suggests that having access to extracurricular activities, trips and experiences will promote high aspirations in students (especially DA students) which will lead to higher academic progress.

All students deserve the chance to experience higher education. Wilmington Academy aims to encourage students to strive for academic excellence through raising aspirations. One of the biggest barriers to raising the aspirations of DA students is the student not knowing their future career path. Providing good quality careers guidance (such as use of My Career Options and UniFrog) will remove that barrier and enable students to make direct links between subject content and career opportunities. The Gatsby Benchmarks will be used as a framework to implement an effective Careers Programme.

Studies have found that mentoring can have positive impacts for pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds such as attitudes to school, attendance and behaviour.

Challenge number(s) addressed

3

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: £15,000

Activity 1

To reduce attendance gap for DA students.

More information

  • College Teams and Attendance Leads prioritise DA absence. To focus on tracking and monitoring pupils ensuring any absences are followed up quickly.
  • Leadership, teachers and tutors prioritise their focus on DA absence.
  • A designated Attendance Champion with clear assigned responsibilities has been employed to ensure attendance systems are deployed effectively.
  • LAT Attendance Officer, Attendance Leads and external agencies to work with hard to reach pupils especially with pupils and families that have been affected by the pandemic.
  • To implement a comprehensive reward system/incentive especially for DA students to raise the profile of the importance of attending school.
  • Ensure that all staff are following the Blended Learning protocols (lessons posted on Google Classroom) so that students that are having to
    self-isolate are provided with the learning opportunities.

Evidence that supports this approach

Attainment of pupils cannot be improved unless they are attending school. The National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) identifies addressing attendance as a key factor especially with students having to self-isolate for extensive periods of time as a result of Covid-19.  Research shows that attendance is key to improving the attainment of pupils and that increased absences can lead to gaps in learning which can accumulate over time. Students need to acquire the knowledge and skills they need to be successful.

Research suggests that rewards and incentives, used wisely (to celebrate outstanding and improved attendance) can be useful in breaking persistent resistance to good attendance. School attendance schemes have been successful in improving pupils’ motivation and their attitudes to school.

Challenge number(s) addressed

2 and 4

Activity 2

To increase parental engagement

More information

  • To continue to develop effective communication with parents, carers and the wider community.
  • To develop effective relationships with the parents/carers by involving parents/carers in supporting their child’s academic learning. To use a range of approaches and programmes such as delivering workshops.

Evidence that supports this approach

According to the EEF, parental engagement through improved communication and regularly reviewing how well the school is working with parents has shown to make moderate impact for low to moderate cost. This has shown to have a higher impact for pupils with low prior attainment.

Challenge number(s) addressed

7

Review of activity from the last academic year

This details how we spent our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) last academic year to address the challenges from the year 2020/21.  The total allocated was £337,384.

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Activity 1

Leaders use current information to address areas of underachievement, especially for disadvantaged pupils.

Desired Outcome

Data drops and mock exam results highlight improvements by 10% in performance of all students, especially disadvantaged pupils.

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Mock exams were taken in Module 2 (Nov/Dec 2020) and Module 4/5 (April/May). The table below shows a summary of the Average Point Score for English and Maths. There is an improvement of more than 10% for all students including disadvantaged (from their first mock results). However, a key focus for next academic year will be to ensure the gap diminishes between DA and non-DA pupils. In the data below, we can see a significant improvement in English Language (the gap closing).

Line management meetings are held between senior and middle leaders to discuss the progress of students, scrutinise the data at each data drop, discuss any barriers to learning and plan strategies to support disadvantaged pupils. Middle leaders are held accountable to ensure that targeted interventions are in place to support pupils that have not made the expected progress. The line management meeting cycle has been successful in holding middle leaders to account and promoting the progress of disadvantaged students.

Lessons learned (and whether you will continue with this approach)

The line management meeting cycle has been a positive contributing factor in improving the progress of disadvantaged pupils. The cycle will continue next academic year with the line management documents reviewed to provide a more rigorous approach.

Activity 2

Blended Learning Strategy – to ensure DA students have access to technology and have the knowledge, skills and confidence to make use of the technology effectively.  To ensure all DA pupils have key resources, revision guides, and stationery to promote learning.

Desired Outcome

  • Google Classroom audit shows an increase in student engagement (especially DA pupils).
  • Case studies show a positive impact of the provisions provided.
  • Many DA parents experience material poverty (resources and equipment).  Providing DA pupils with resources allows DA pupils to fully access the curriculum.

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Student engagement was tracked using the Digital Engagement Score (DES) Tracker which ranks students from 1 (low engagement) to 5 (high engagement). The average DES grades are summarised below.

  • Year 07 – 2.9
  • Year 08 – 2.8
  • Year 09 – 2.6
  • Year 10 – 3.0
  • Year 11 – 3.2

At the beginning of lockdown, the academy sent a Google Form to parents to gather information regarding IT accessibility at home.

Parents that have experienced internet issues received a mobile Wifi device through the Trust.  Parents of disadvantaged students were provided guidance on how to apply for extra data through their network provider.

Overall, 40 laptops have been distributed to students who did not have a device to access the online learning. This was in addition to laptops being distributed to disadvantaged students (all disadvantaged students were offered a device).

Also Year 7 (through our 1-2-1 scheme) have all been given the opportunity to have a chromebook. These all have been distributed.

During lockdown, it was a huge priority for pastoral teams to educate families where a technology gap may appear. Where required, parents and students
have received virtual master classes to support themselves with access to online learning.

Due to Covid, having access to resources was even more important. All DA students were provided with stationery, equipment and a reading book for their home learning. Where appropriate, faculties provided
revision guides and other resources.

Lessons learned (and whether you will continue with this approach)

The 1-2-1 Chromebook scheme will continue next academic year. All new Year 7s will be provided with a Chromebook as part of the Blended Learning Strategy.

To continue to ensure all DA students have the right equipment and resources in place for home and school learning.

Activity 3

To develop the pedagogy of Blended Learning/Adaptive Teaching with the use of Google Classroom to provide the highest quality first teaching and learning opportunities for all students to ensure they make rapid progress.

More information

  • Ensure the IB Learner Profile attributes are embedded across all departments.
  • Focus on quality first teaching so that all DA students are making expected progress especially in English, maths and science. Departments are putting in place interventions, monitored by DoLs, Subject Leaders
    and SLT.
  • Carry out regular learning walks and sampling of RoPs to ensure that all staff are delivering inquiry based learning strategies effectively.
  • Ensure best Teaching and Learning practice is shared within departments and provide opportunities for coaching outside department area.
  • Ensure external CPD is effectively shared with staff across the school to raise standards of Teaching and Learning.

Desired Outcome

  • 95% of teaching across the school and subjects is at least good with evidence of outstanding teaching over time. Lessons are highly effective and engaging, feedback and marking are constructive and enable students to make rapid progress.
  • Students make rapid progress because teachers ensure they are able to identify and discuss the progress they make and articulate their next steps clearly (RoPs).
  • Regular sharing of best practice between staff and across the Trust promotes high quality professional dialogue between staff and continued improvements to the quality of teaching.

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Due to Covid restrictions, observations did not take place until Module 6. The data shows that 88% of teaching is effective or better (31% Highly Effective and 57% Effective). The observation cycle will continue next academic year (in Modules 1 and 2) and each cycle will have a different focus including strategies for disadvantaged students.  The following strategies have been targeted to promote the progress of disadvantaged students:

  • Teaching and learning strategies targeted to reduce the gap.
  • Use of IRIS Connect and CPD to equip teachers with the skills needed to close the gap.
  • Disadvantaged students are targeted for the National Tutoring Programme (MyTutor- 3:1 ratio).
  • Disadvantaged students given priority in all intervention planning.
  • Retrieval practice to be used in every lesson.
  • Core PE time used for additional support.

Lessons learned (and whether you will continue with this approach)

The new bespoke CPD programme will equip teachers with the tools that they need to promote progress in all students including disadvantaged.  The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework will be implemented in all classrooms to ensure all students are provided with appropriate challenge to enable them to think more deeply.

To support teachers in improving their teaching practice, the Academy has signed up to two new CPD providers: The Chartered College of Teaching and The National College. This will give teachers access to the latest pedagogy and educational thinking.

Activity 4

Close the attainment gap for disadvantaged pupils.

More information

  • Implement a Work-Action-Result (WAR) Board for
    Year 11 students. SLT to mentor key students.
  • Seating plans highlight DA students.
  • Further CPD on DA strategies delivered to all staff.
  • DA focus embedded in lesson planning.
  • All staff model language and writing for all pupils but target DA pupils especially.
  • All staff use questioning techniques that support DA pupils to engage and learn more effectively in lessons, as well as check DA make good progress in lessons.
  • Teachers prioritise the marking of DA pupils’ RoP folders and in giving feedback.
  • Staff to carefully plan verbal feedback for DA pupils so that they are very clear about what they need to do to improve.
  • DA are prioritised for revision sessions.
  • Intervention targets underperforming DA students.
  • Directors of Learning/Subject Leaders are questioned about DA performance in Line Management/Review meetings.
  • DA and literacy catch-up premium pupils have access to the Accelerated Reading Programme to improve their reading skills so that they can access the curriculum.
  • ‘Learning conversations’ take place regularly within the tutor group in the form of one-to-one mentoring, advice and personal support (improved knowledge of the individual pupils and their needs ensure staff provide tailored additional support).

Desired Outcome

  • All teachers target DA students.
  • Minimum expectations that these students attain within 10% or less of other students with similar starting points. The 2021 GCSE results will show an upward trend in the number of students achieving grades 4-9 in both English and maths.
  • Learning walks show DA pupils identified clearly in lessons with support in place.
  • The gap diminishes between DA and others. The 2021 Progress 8 score will show an improvement from 2020. Progress 8 for DA students should be
    inline with national average (non-selective schools in Kent).

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

All teachers are aware of who their disadvantaged students are (identified in class lists, registers and seating plans). Due to Covid restrictions, DA learning
walks were not carried out this academic year but will resume in 2021/2022.

The 2021 GCSE results show an upward trend in the number of students achieving grades 4-9 in both English and maths (57% in 2021 compared with 47% in 2020). The Progress 8 score shows a significant improvement (-0.37 in 2021 compared with -0.54 in 2020). The gap between DA and others for % of students achieving grades 4-9 in both English and Maths is within 10%. However, the gap for Progress 8 and Attainment 8 is still more than 10%. Reducing the attainment gap further will continue to be a high priority next academic year.

The 2021 GCSE results are summarised below. Disadvantaged (DA) GCSE Data 2020/2021

Lessons learned (and whether you will continue with this approach)

The Academy will be offering all Year 11 disadvantaged students the opportunity to have 1:1 online tutoring with MyTutor as part of the National Tutoring Programme to accelerate the progress of students.

Activity 5

All students are challenged and inspired to excel through high expectations in literacy.

More information

  • To embed whole-school literacy initiative (Keys to Success) with particular focus on key vocabulary (‘Word-Rich Classrooms’).
  • To STAR test students in Years 7 -9 and track progress each term.
  • MYON and AR – To regularly monitor the data through the online reporting system. This data is regularly shared with AR/MYON teachers as well as English teachers to evaluate the impact of the digital platforms.  MYON is also Quality Assured at LAT trust level to ascertain the
    impact.

Desired Outcome

  • Years 7-9 DA students to show improved reading age scores. There will be a reduction of the gap between chronological age and reading age.
  • There is measurable and increased impact of targeted intervention. 95% of students who are below a scaled score of 100 make good progress. The
    intervention is closely tracked and evaluated for impact throughout the year.
  • Observations/faculty reviews and students’ work illustrate that all teachers consistently model and promote high standards of literacy.
  • There is a consistent approach to the teaching and marking of literacy across the curriculum.

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

The ‘Word of the Week’ was embedded as part of the whole school literacy programme. Recent STAR tests have revealed that students have made reading age gains despite lockdown due to the deliberate actions taken to ensure that Accelerated Reader and MyON continued as part of home learning. The results for the STAR testing are summarised in the presentation below which includes progress of DA pupils. STAR Testing Results

The Academy implemented the safe borrowing of library books using Google forms and the use of book boxes in each year group bubble. Google classrooms
were used for Accelerated Reader lessons to monitor the progress of reading and the use of electronic reading logs to support student progress in a safe manner. Book borrowing (and MYON reading) is on an upward trend -over 10205 books being read and the number increases daily. Our students have maintained their reading engagement throughout lockdown and the return to school! The distribution of laptops has supported the use of MYON especially at KS3 level, thus boosting the reading engagement of students.

The World Book Day Event was facilitated virtually this academic year (The Wilmington Games). The ‘Masked Reader’ event, author visit from Matt Oldfield (virtual) and the ‘Staff Favourite Book Presentation’ increased student participation and engagement.

Bespoke literacy lessons were offered to upskill KS3 and KS4 students with a focus on addressing more advanced punctuation to raise the grades of students
in their assessments and exams.

The launch of the ‘Amanda Gorman’ Poetry Competition (across all year groups) was very successful.

Due to Covid restrictions, observations and learning walks were not carried out until Module 6. Literacy learning walks will continue next academic year to ensure there is a consistent approach in marking for literacy. This will be a main focus in the next observation cycle.

Lessons learned (and whether you will continue with this approach)

The key strategy for next academic year will be to maintain and strengthen ‘word-rich’ classrooms with a focus on vocabulary development (emphasis on Tier 2 and Tier 3 vocabulary and a 4 step approach to vocabulary – select, explain, explore and consolidate).

To foster ‘ word-consciousness’ in our students through the use of ‘vocabulary notebooks’.

To embed the Literacy Keys more confidently and more effectively throughout the school and especially in lessons.

To continue with the Accelerated Reader (Years 7-8) and MYON programmes (Years 7-10). STAR testing of students in Years 7-10 to track progress each term.

To build on our success with ‘Marking for Literacy’ and ensure that it is highlighted more effectively in all R.o.P. folders.

The Literacy Student Council was deferred last year due to Covid. However, we would be relaunching it again next academic year to reflect and evaluate the impact of the literacy action plan.

In order to increase parental engagement, we would be implementing Literacy Parents’ Evenings to highlight Oracy initiatives, Poetry by Heart competitions as well as to foster family literacy activities (again deferred from last year due to Covid).

As an intervention tool for specific micro-populations, we would be trialling Bedrock Learning (research-based curriculum that teaches students the language they need to succeed at school).

We would also be introducing the use of ACE Dictionaries to support dyslexic students in lessons.

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Activity 1

Close the gap between DA and non-DA students with regards to oncalls, isolations and exclusions.  To support DA pupils with SEND in handling their behaviour (well-being and academic progress).

Desired Outcome

  • Behaviour log shows a reduction in the number of behaviour incidents
    for DA students.
  • 2020-2021 target is for DA figures to be inline with non-DA.

PP Behaviour Analysis

The behaviour log shows that the number of behaviour incidents for DA have reduced from Term 1 (Modules 1 & 2) to Term 3 (Modules 5 & 6). Staff are regularly updated with SEND information so that they can deliver Quality First Teaching with the appropriate support in class.

Students that received the most behaviour points in each year group received mentoring from Heads of Year and from the Well-being Manager (as an intervention strategy). Emotional support and development in social skills were also offered to disadvantaged students.

Much higher standards were brought in for behaviour this academic year. The strategies used included: Weekly Behaviour Analysis Report, isolation/report cards, restorative justice, rewards (Graduation Stars), sanctions (centralised CUC and SLT detention system and late detentions) and ScreenCastify videos in setting expectations. This has resulted in a calm, purposeful and happy environment with high quality teaching. The new centralised CUC and SLT detention system has increased rigour in the administration of detentions. This
has had a positive impact in raising standards as it enables clear and timely accountability for poor behaviour in lessons and during unstructured time.

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Lessons learned (and whether you will continue with this approach)

The centralised CUC and SLT detention system will continue next
academic year.

The Weekly Behaviour Report Analysis has had the greatest impact as Tutors and College Teams are able to address positive/negative behaviour effectively.

A new behaviour policy has been written to ensure all staff implement the behaviour policy and procedures consistently. The Oncall Procedure and 4 Point Behaviour Plan have been reviewed to increase efficiency and clarity.

Activity 2

To increase the number of DA students accessing extracurricular activities, trips (Covid-19 restrictions permitting) and experiences.  To ensure DA pupils are making informed choices about their futures.  To implement a Post 16 Mentoring Programme to ensure DA students have the life skills and the strategies to succeed academically at school and beyond.

Desired Outcome

Across the year, there is a programme of enrichment opportunities, which target DA pupils.

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria?  Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Trips and enrichment activities were suspended due to Covid restrictions.  However, Year 8 and 10 students had the opportunity to attend a school trip as part of the Summer School Programme.

Year 9 had the opportunity to attend a careers meeting this academic year. The academy employs a Careers advisor to have 1-1 meetings with the students and appropriate support is given as needed. All Year 11 participated in the Careers Support Programme as part of their Induction Week (for 6th Form) and Years 10 and 11 had bespoke career sessions during tutor time.

This has resulted in 0% NEETS in 2020/21. In the 6th Form, 82% of our 2020/21 cohort went onto higher education or employment. Every student has been able to secure their first choice destination with 3 students attending Russell Group Universities.

Due to Covid restrictions, the Post 16 Mentoring Programme had to be placed on hold. However, Heads of Year were able to mentor DA students during Tutor time and provide guidance for Year 9 students during the option process.

Lessons learned (and whether you will continue with this approach)

The Careers Coordinator will continue to further develop the careers provision through a comprehensive strategic plan. The academy will be launching UniFrog (whole-school careers and destinations platform) for KS3, 4 and 5 students.

The careers advisor will continue to work with disadvantaged students at the academy.

With Covid restrictions being lifted, we would continue to focus on ensuring that DA students are provided with the opportunity to participate in extracurricular activities, trips (including international) and experiences.

There will also be a focus on raising the aspirations of disadvantaged students through parental engagement. The plan is to implement parental support evenings/workshops next academic year.

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Activity 1

Reduce attendance gap for DA pupils.

More information

  • College Teams prioritise DA absence.
  • Leadership, teachers and tutors prioritise their focus on DA absence.
  • To implement a comprehensive reward system/ incentive especially for DA students to raise the profile of the importance of attending school

Desired Outcome

Improved attendance of DA pupils across all year groups.

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria?  Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Despite Covid 19, the percentage of PP attendance has been consistent as shown below in the 3 year trend.  Non-PPG students also follow a similar trend. At the end
of the 2020/21 academic year, PP attendance was 91.1%

Pupil premium data 2

The attendance leads will continue to monitor the attendance of our most vulnerable students through daily lesson checks, daily calls home and home visits if necessary.

HERO Attendance Programme
The HERO Attendance Reward Programme was launched in Week 2 of Module 2 but due to the closure of schools (Covid), the programme was temporarily placed on hold. The Programme was relaunched in Week 3 of Module 4 until Week 6 of Module 5. A summary of the percentage of student absence (YTD) is outlined below.  Although the percentage of student absence for disadvantaged (and non-DA) has increased, the programme will continue next academic year to fully measure the impact of the incentive.

Pupil premium data 3

Lessons learned (and whether you will continue with this approach)

The attendance leads will continue to monitor the attendance of our most vulnerable students through daily lesson checks, daily calls home and home visits if necessary.

Activity 2

To increase parental engagement (Parents’ Evenings).

SLT/SSMs to arrange virtual meetings with key students/parents/carers (Parents’ Evenings).

To improve and develop relationships with the parents/carers of DA pupils by offering support through virtual meetings/workshops (literacy).

To implement a Year 6 Transition Summer Programme which targets DA pupils.

Desired Outcome

  • Increase in parental satisfaction in parents’ evening survey.
  • Increase in parental attendance to parents’ evenings across all year groups (virtual). Students eligible for PP to reach 100% due to meetings being virtual/conventional phone calls.
  • Across the year, there is a programme of events that engage parents/carers in their child’s education and create a sense of community.

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

This was the first year when the Academy adopted a completely virtual approach for the way parental communications take place.  SchoolCloud is an online platform which allows teachers and parents to meet remotely through video call (Parents’ Evening).
The launch of the system has generated much positive feedback with 96% of parents rating their overall experience as good or better and 85% of parents that would like to continue to use this system for future Parents’ Evenings.

The overall attendance for each year group is summarised below.
Year 7 – 76%
Year 8 – N/A (convectional phone calls)
Year 9 – 77%
Year 10 – 71%
Year 11 – 62% (network maintenance – outage)
Post 16 – 86%

The aim of the Summer School is to provide a bespoke catch up programme to support pupils most affected by the pandemic. Year 7 students have settled in well during their first week at Wilmington Academy, showing great enthusiasm, a desire for learning and have adapted to new routines with ease.

The overall attendance for the Summer School Programme is outlined below.
Thursday 22nd July – 63% (personal invitation – some students unable to attend due to having to isolate)
Friday 23rd July – 63% (personal invitation – some students unable to attend due to having to isolate)
Monday 26 July – (Jupiter 65% of cohort attended)
Tuesday 27 July – (Minerva 73% of cohort attended)
Wednesday 28 July – (Apollo 80% of cohort attended)

Lessons learned (and whether you will continue with this approach)

Due to the increase in parental engagement to Parents’ Evening, the Academy would continue to use School Cloud next academic year with the view to also include some face-to-face meetings with certain year groups.

Due to the success of Summer School, we hope to provide the same opportunity next academic year (funding permitting).